Westminster Unionists Abused the Scottish Electorate in the 2014 Independence Referendum Campaign-Lessons Learnt-Next Time We Need To Negate the Threat

 

 

Yes and No supporters in Edinburgh

https://d.ibtimes.co.uk/en/full/1399996/scotland-independence.jpg

 

 

Nov 2014: The 2014 Referendum

In the Scottish Independence referendum the voter list included anyone  entered on the current electoral roll, over the age of 16,, whose place of residence was in Scotland, regardless of nationality. The usual caveats about Service personnel also applied.

Voter turnout was 84.59%.

The result:

Yes, 1,617,989, 44.70%.

No, 2,001,926, 55.30%

There is an acceptance within Scotland that a majority of the 240,000 EU and non EU immigrant voters and many voters of Scottish birth and residence had been persuaded to vote “no” frightened into submission by an incessant campaign of disinformation orchestrated by the UK Civil Service, Westminster politicians, the UK government and opposition Party’s,  the BBC and all other media outlets and their organs of abuse of Scots in the guise of serving Scotland.

Indeed not long after the referendum Unionists “crowed from the rooftops” fighting each other for media space each claiming it was their disinformation output that had been the most influential in gaining the “no” vote.

But the award should go to the covert Civil Service anti-independence team, funded by the Scottish taxpayers but working out of Downing Street under the guidance of the late Sir Jeremy Heywood, Cabinet Secretary and Head of the Civil Service.

 

 

 

Postal Voting

790,000 postal voting forms were issued, completed and returned within the notified time period.

But the novel and as yet unproven voting procedure, heavily promoted by the governing authority, was sullied when, just after voting closed, Ruth Davidson, and other influential supporters of the “no” campaign boasted they had known well before 18 September 2014 that postal votes indicated a win for their campaign.

There was a police investigation into the matter but the findings were never notified to the Scottish public who are still waiting for answers, with result many Scot’s believe the outcome of the referendum had been fixed in favour of the “no” campaign.

 

 

 

Nov 2014: No Country in History has ever rejected Independence – Until Scotland in 2014

Comment: Christian Wright – DYSTOPIA wrote:

“On 18th September 2014, for the first time in the long history of the world, a country committed national suicide in front of a live global audience. The voters of Scotland, a land with a thousand years provenance, and seven centuries a nation, declined to take responsibility for their own governance, and instead, entrusted it to a cabal of elitists from whom they can expect naught but sneering contempt.”

 

 

 

Edinburgh University 2014 Referendum Analysis

The biggest study yet of how Scotland made its historic decision on 18 September 2014 found that the votes of people born outside Scotland were crucial to the result.

Whilst 52.7 per cent of native-born Scots voted Yes, a massive 72.1 per cent of voters from England, Wales or Northern Ireland backed the Union.

There were more than 420,000 Britons from elsewhere in the UK living in Scotland when the last census was taken and if they cast their ballots in line with the findings of the Edinburgh University study, more than 300,000 of them will have voted No.

That’s a significant number in a contest that ended with 2,001,926 no votes and 1,617,989 for yes.

Voters born outside the UK also rejected independence, with 57.1 per cent voting no.

Political scientist Professor Ailsa Henderson, who wrote the study said it showed the influence of “Britishness” among voters born elsewhere in the UK in deciding the result.

She said: “Scottish-born people were more likely to vote Yes and those born outside Scotland were more likely to vote No.

But the least sympathetic to Yes were the people born in the UK, but outside Scotland.

We think they are more likely to feel British. They are more likely to feel a continued tie to the UK as a whole – because that’s where they are from.”

 

How the electorate voted (by place of birth) - [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

How the electorate voted (by place of birth) – [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

52.7 per cent of native-born Scots voted Yes

But, a massive 72.1 per cent of voters from England, Wales or Northern Ireland voted No.

There were more than 420,000 Britons from elsewhere in the UK living in Scotland when the last census was taken.

And if they cast their ballots in line with the findings of the Edinburgh University study, more than 300,000 of them will have voted No.

 

How the electorate voted (by sex) - [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

How the electorate voted (by sex) – [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

Researchers found that 56.6 per cent of women voted No while 53.2 per cent of men voted Yes.

 

How the electorate voted (by age)

How the electorate voted (by age) – [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

The divide was even wider when it came to age. More than 62 per cent of voters aged 16 to 19 backed independence.

The Yes side also had a majority among voters aged 20 to 24, 25 to 29 and 30-39, while voters aged 40 to 49 were split almost exactly down the middle.

But 50 to 59-year-olds, 60 to 69-year-olds and voters aged 70 or older were all in the No camp, with the pro-Union majority getting bigger the older they were.

 

How the electorate voted (by social status) - [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

How the electorate voted (by social status) – [Blue = YES] [Green = NO]

Yes had majorities among people who classed themselves as working class, people at the bottom of the earnings scale and people in rented social housing.

The highest earners, home owners and people who described themselves as middle class were more likely to vote No.

 

 

 

Recommendations for the the Next Referendum

It is a fact that Westminster will use every trick in the book and many not yet identified to deny Scots an independence referendum free of external influences and the Scottish government will need to be alert to state sponsored shenanigans.

Experience before, during and after the 2014 referendum supports the need for major changes to procedures in any future referendum.

To ensure a level playing field the following changes are recommended:

1. Voting is to be restricted to Scottish income tax payers whose main place of residence is and has been in Scotland continuously from the beginning of January 2015.

2. Voting rights are to be extended to persons aged sixteen on the date of the referendum,

3. Qualified proxy voting is to be permitted.

4. Completed proxy returns are to be retained, unopened, in a secure location in Scotland under the control of the Scottish Police Force.

5. Proxy votes are to be delivered to counting officers between 2000-2200 on the day of voting, to be opened from 2200 hours, verified for correctness and counted.

6. Exit polling at voter venues is to be permitted.

7. State funded (Westminster or Scottish governments) production or distribution of literature to households, in the course of the campaign is deprecated.

8. The Scottish Government, Scottish Parliament, Scottish public authorities and (by agreement) the UK Government are to strictly observe a 28 day, “pre-vote period” of restriction on publications, (including those which might be published on their behalf, by public media outlets by proxy) relating to the referendum.

8. A media monitoring panel, (authorized to review and instruct amendments to BBC and independent radio and television content before broadcasting) is to be appointed.

It is to comprise two “Yes”, two “no” supporters and an independent chair and vice chair, (recruited from The Republic of Ireland and France). The panel’s decisions are final.

 

https://gscott123.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/none-queen_elizabeth-scottish_referendum-scottish_independence_referendum-british_politics-better_together-mkan738_low.jpg?w=252&h=300

 

 

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16 thoughts on “Westminster Unionists Abused the Scottish Electorate in the 2014 Independence Referendum Campaign-Lessons Learnt-Next Time We Need To Negate the Threat”

  1. The weakness of your proposal is that it rules out incomers who see themselves as ‘scots’, e.g. by naturalisation. But then there would need to be some way to officially recognise Scottish nationality as apart from (or even as a part of ??) British nationality, at least up until independence. Given the level of fudge over nationality that currently exists in the North of Ireland, would that really be too difficult?

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    1. My proposal is to include only individuals born and residing in Scotland. This ensures only persons with a Scottish heritage are able to decide the future status of the country. Incomers who would vote “Yes” are vastly outnumbered by those who would vote “No”. In the 2014 referendum 52%+ Scots voted for independence. The resultant final figure of 55% “No” was warped by the votes of persons from outwith Scotland gaining a vote due to residential qualification. Many left Scotland returning to England and northern Ireland soon after.

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      1. I see your point, but fear that it could easily be characterised as just another (non too subtle?) way of fiddling the figures.
        Firstly, we’re rather young at birth and have no control whatever over the circumstances. Anymore than e.g. the colour of our skin etc.
        Secondly, the principle I’m familiar with is that by and large decisions should be made by those who will be effected by them.
        So for example someone born in Scotland but raised elsewhere in the UK, and who just happened to be resident north of the Border when the referendum was called, even though they had no permanent attachment to Scotland (e.g. they might just be working or studying there for a year or two) would get a vote by your rules, even though they would barely be effected by the outcome.

        I would like to see an Indy Scotland, indeed it’s long overdue, but I don’t see how fiddling the franchise could do anything but harm. If it were proven statistically that e.g. left-handers were more likely to vote against Scotland, would you seek to disqualify them too?

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      2. wow! thanks a bunch! As someone who was born in France and voted yes in the referendum, married to an English man who also voted yes, thanks for your blinkered attitude regarding who belongs, who has rights and who does not. Thanks for your total disregard for those who genuinely care for Scotland. I cant tell you how many so called real Scots I convinced to vote yes in the referendum who wanted to vote no….How far do you intend to go back in time to prove Scottish roots? Being French, you can bet that I have roots that go back to the Auld Alliance. …What you propose is simply that those you consider “other” should not have a voice. In doing so, you reveal your own prejudice and your xenophobia…I had met this kind of prejudice when I was living in England, but not once since deciding to live in Scotland. So thank you for this new experience and for opening my eyes. I now know my place.

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      3. Cathie, You are so wrong. Of course you would have a voice in an independent Scotland. But non-Scot “yes” voters are vastly outnumbered by those who would vote “No”. A fact evidenced by the result of the 2014 referendum. I contend that a voting base as I envisaged would provide the best chance of a positive result next time. To conduct a referendum with the same criteria as before would be foolish to the extreme. Persons such as yourself, who support an independent Scotland should be happy to stand down from the process if it assists the aspirations of all who wish to live in a Scotland free of the unfair external political pressures of Westminster.

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  2. I feel your views are completely contrary to those of the SNP who continuously say how inclusive they are and how they welcome immigration so to preclude them from voting would certainly be anti everything the SNP say.

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    1. The SNP’s inclusivity agenda brought about the 2014 defeat. The Scottish independence movement needs to learn lessons and adjust priorities to ensure a win next time. The revelation in the Edinburgh University report on the referendum that Scots born voters decided 52.7% in favour of independence was thwarted by voters from outwith Scotland.

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  3. Calton jock :don’t worry, Westminster is ensuring that EU citizens will not be allowed to vote in any referendum… Like we were not allowed to vote in the brexit referendum. Why do you think that is? Honestly wondering whether you really have the good of Scotland at heart.

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    1. Cathie, I can assure you I do have the best interests of Scotland at heart. Our chances of succeeding are greatly improved if you and others like you are denied a vote, just the one time. Thereafter all who choose to reside in an independent Scotland who are not Scots by birth will be able to apply for citizenship fully regularizing their status.

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      1. When Westminster sends the tanks to Scotland, would you like eu citizens living in Scotland to stand down too? Basically what you want is for only those who are Scottish by birth and voting yes to be allowed to vote. This is, quite frankly a ridiculous concept!

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  4. There are always rules about nationality everywhere in the world and although there is as yet no Scottish passport and no Scottish citizenship law we could apply acceptable existing law from elsewhere to determine a nationality for people.What better than to use existing UK law .
    To get a UK passport you either have to reside in uk and have been born here or reside in uk and have a parent who was born here.
    So applying that on a Scottish basis would mean that to be able to vote in a Scottish independence referendum you would have to either
    a) be resident in Scotland and have been born here
    OR
    b) be resident in Scotland and not born here but one of your parents were born here

    Not difficult
    Residing in a country should not and does not anywhere in the world on its own give you the right to have a passport or get citizenship or have all the voting rights, there are of course different rules in existence for different kinds of voting depending on whether it’s a local election a general election etc etc.
    In some countries you can have voting rights if you have lived there for a set minimum number of years but that is not the case in all countries.
    I have lived in many countries around the world, I still care for those countries but I did not at any time believe that I should have a right to determine those countries long term future and rightly so I don’t live in them any longer and that was the problem with the Scottish independence referendum you only had to be living in Scotland on the FDA’s of the referendum to qualify for a vote, many many of those who voted have left Scotland never to return, the chances of never to return is increased for those who were not born here or who’s parents were not born here, most people living in a particular country are doing so because they were born there or their parents were born their they have family history there.
    This crazy idea that just because Scotland happens to be where you are living at this moment in time gives you the right to vote on its long term future is plain silly and unprecedented.
    There may be exceptions but there are exceptions in all considerations of nationality and voting rights ,the exceptions are minute and acceptable in the quest for fairness for the huge majority.

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  5. No other country in Europe applies the ‘inclusivity’ principle as in Indy14. The SNP committed independence suicide by uniquely and exclusively applying inclusivity to a constitutional vote. What’s the problem with the SNP using the European standard?

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    1. I agree entirely. It may be English born people who qualify through residential qualification would honour the privilege extended to them by a quirk of fate and abstain from voting, if they are unable to vote Yes.

      Like

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