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John Swinney Tells the Salmond – Sturgeon Inquiry Where to Get Off

 

 

 

Committee on the Scottish Government Handling of Harassment Complaints

John Swinney:

“You wrote to three Scottish Government civil servants on 29 October asking questions in
connection with the Committee’s work. As you know, civil servants work on behalf of Ministers,
and so I am responding to your questions on behalf of the Scottish Government.

In relation to your letter to Liz Lloyd…………………………………………………

In relation to the letter to John Somers…………………………………………….

In relation to your letter to the other civil servant……………………………….

In relation to the development of the procedure………………………………..

In relation to the judicial review………………………………………………………

And finally:

“I would be grateful for your further assistance in addressing my continuing concerns
about some interactions between civil servants and Committee members at the Committee.
As we have previously discussed, civil servants play an important role in supporting Ministers
who are properly held to account by Parliament for the actions of the government. The rules
governing civil servants’ appearances are well established and understood by all parties and
normally work well, in my opinion. Scottish Ministers have a duty of care for civil servants employed by the Scottish Government. While the normal rules that usually govern the way we work together are not observed by all Committee Members, the ability of Ministers to discharge that duty of care for these witnesses is jeopardized.”

Complete letter here:(https://www.parliament.scot/HarassmentComplaintsCommittee/General%20documents/20201106DFMtoConvener.pdf)

 

Comment: Swinney takes the investigating committee to task over its questioning of three civil servants who may be in possession of information relevant to the inquiry. His assertion that civil servants report to Scottish Government Ministers and as such all questions relating to their work should be addressed to their political masters is for students of the Law to discuss and decide upon but in my opinion, his view is coloured by a need to buy time. But for what purpose?? And compare his defense of Scottish Government civil servants and their actions against the active participation of Westminster based civil servants who aided and assisted “Better Together” campaigners and foreign governments against Scots in the  2014 Referendum Campaign.

 

 

 

 Civil Servants Seconded from Westminster to the Scottish Office in 2014

Francesca Osowska: “All activities undertaken by civil servants in my Department would meet a propriety test, yet I think you would agree that in the run-up to a referendum, obviously when Ministers want to be more visible, when we need to ensure that there is a good flow of public information for example, via the Scotland analysis papers that increase our activity and that is why there was an increase between 2013-14 out turn and 2014-15 out turn.”

* But reflect on the proudly broadcast admission of the self-same Civil Servants that they had been seconded to the Scottish Office (in Westminster) and had been tasked, to provide active support to the “Better Together” campaign. Actions that brought about the defeat of Scots who wished only to be an independent nation once again. What a bunch of charlatans.

 

 

November 2014: Team of senior civil servants seconded from the Treasury to the Scottish Office to actively participate in the Better Together campaign in the 2014 referendum 

Sir Jeremy Heywood took great pleasure in awarding the team “The Cabinet Secretary and Head of the Civil Service Award 2014” in recognition of their outstanding achievements in helping defeat Scots separatists on an issue of national importance. Glowing with pride after the presentation some of the leaders were quoted:

Mario Pisani Deputy Director at HM Treasury said:

“We all had something in common, we’re trying to save the Union. We just kept it by the skin of our teeth. I actually cried when the result came in. After 10 years in the civil service, my proudest moment is tonight and receiving this award. As civil servants, you are prevented by statute from getting involved in politics. So, for the first time in my life, suddenly we’re part of a political campaign. We were actively involved in everything from the analysis to the advertising, to the communications. I just felt a massive sense of being part of the operation. This being publically recognized (at the Civil Service Awards), makes me feel just incredibly proud.”

Paul Doyle; Senior Treasury Official

“This award is not just for the Treasury, it’s for all the hard work that was done by all government departments in Westminster and in Scotland assisting the “Better Together” campaign on the Scotland referendum agenda. In all my experience of the civil service, I have never seen the civil service pull together in the way they did behind supporting the UK government in maintaining the United Kingdom. It was very special to all of us.”

Shannon Cochrane; Senior Treasury Official 

“We’ve learned that politicians are able to task civil servants to work on things that are inherently political and quite difficult. This places the actions of civil servants very close to the line of what is lawful, but it’s possible to find your way through and to make a difference.”

William MacFarlane; Deputy Director HM Treasury, (Budget and Tax Strategy)

“As civil servants, you are not allowed to get involved in the politics of the country. But, for the first time in my life, we’re part of a political campaign. We were involved in everything from analysis to advertising, to communications. I just felt a massive sense of being part of the operation. Recognition of our work being recognized (at the Civil Service Awards), makes me feel just incredibly proud.”

Note:

The secondment of 20-30 senior civil servants from the Treasury to provide professional support to the “Better Together” campaign was done without the knowledge of the Scottish Government. Adding insult to injury the Scottish Office met all of their salaries and on-costs using finance provided to Scotland. (The civil Service World) (All comments paraphrased)

 

Civil Servants and Janus Faced Illegal politicking Against Scots

Francesca Osowska, in a number of evasive statements, neglected to reveal that Civil Servants had, in a  gross misuse of public finances, been authorized at the highest level of the UK Government to actively support the objectives of the “Better Together” campaign.

She confirmed that Mundell retained access to funding sufficient to employ up to 100 whole-time equivalents (W.T.E.) posts and that salary and incidental costs arising from such employment are (top sliced) from Scotland’s block grant before the allocation of finance to the Scottish government.

The slush fund created is an ever-increasing annual financial nest egg, skimmed off Scotland’s block financial grant and used, abused by Scottish Office management for anti-devolution leaflet production, printing, and distribution and the secondment of Civil Servants from other Government Departments and employment of Special Advisors (SpAds), often well connected to friends of ministers or other MP’s.

 

 

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The 2014 Commonwealth Games Were Nobbled by Unionist Civil Servants, Politicians and Labour Party Councillors and There Was No Legacy

 

 

The Glasgow Commonwealth Games

This report formed part of an earlier post which in retrospect was overlong and had lost impact.

In December 2009 “Elite” civil servant Franseca Osowska was promoted to the role of Director for Culture, External Affairs, and Tourism with responsibility for developing Scotlands bid for the Commonwealth Games.

Promoted yet again in January 2013 she was appointed Director of the Commonwealth Games, a role requiring her to coordinate the work of a large team of senior officers, political figures, and civil servants (seconded to Scotland from London).

Through her links with the secretive “Common Purpose” networking organization, she recruited the “33Fifty” group, a team of young right-wing leaders of the future who participated in the policing of the games ensuring any display of the Saltire or singing of the Scottish anthem was snuffed out and guilty parties ejected from venues.

Talk about a police state. The Unionists even nobbled the games in their favour. All under the noses of Scots caught up in the Westminster civil service carefully manufactured hype.

She was rewarded with an OBE and her team of “Elite” civil servants from London were praised and awarded “Civil Service Certificates of Merit” in recognition of the long hours and their hard graft undermining the will of Scots to break free from the Union. And she would later tell the Scottish Affairs Committee that her team of “Elite” civil servants had acted entirely appropriately throughout 2014. A statement later exposed as a lie when the Civil Servants crowed to the English press about their undercover, illegal work in support of “Better Together”

The remit specific to herself was to regenerate the East End of Glasgow and to ensure the delivery of a lasting legacy for Scotland. This she duly did and for which in January 2015, she was awarded an OBE, for services to Government and the Commonwealth Games Committee in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list.

Her sales pitch to the nation: https://www.surf.scot/scotregen/ensuring-a-lasting-legacy-from-2014-commonwealth-games-2/

 

Physical Fitness in the Community

A major selling point of the Games was the promise of a significant and sustained increase in physical activity within the community as residents flocked to and used the many new sports facilities available to them.

But a study completed four years after the games by “GoWell East” found the number of physically active locals had fallen from 62 percent in 2012 to just over 50 percent.

 Dalmarnock in 2008 sees a playpark and trees

 

Regeneration

Halls and other facilities were demolished as part of the regeneration of the area and replaced with a sparkling new facility named the “Legacy Hub” which cost around £4m to build.

Four years on, plagued by corruption and malfeasance the “Hub” shut its doors. Another Commonwealth Games venture that had failed to deliver the much-vaunted “Games Legacy.”

Large areas of the Dalmarnock community housing estate were razed to the ground because they were considered to be unsightly and residents, in some cases were forcibly removed from their properties under compulsory purchase orders greatly undervaluing the housing.

Many residents were relocated to similar run down pre-war properties outwith Dalmarnock with some finding accommodation after the games in the new housing stock built to house the games athletes.

Four years on Dalmarnock is still an eyesore and as shabby and derelict is as it ever was.

Local residents complain that their community has lost its heart with the closure of just about all of its corner shops and other amenities.

The much-vaunted investment in the future had proved to be a crock of s**t.

A local councillor admitted the promised improvements had not materialized and the community was hopelessly split between residents of “old Dalmarnock” those of the new village (previously the athletes’ accommodation.)

Full story here:
https://caltonjock.com/2016/03/02/fraud-corruption-in-public-office-glasgows-commonwealth-games-legacy/
https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/14324335.glasgow-labour-councillor-behind-troubled-commonwealth-games-project-put-on-leaveamid-finance-probe/
https://caltonjock.com/2016/03/02/fraud-corruption-in-public-office-glasgows-commonwealth-games-legacy/

 But in 2019 things look no better

 

Improving the Lifestyle of Underprivileged Families

A key legacy of Glasgow 2014 was that thousands of mattresses, beds, wardrobes, chairs, and other furnishings from the athletes’ village was to be distributed to poor and vulnerable families.

The scheme was announced to great fanfare prompting a long list of social housing clients to sign up in the hope of transforming their homes with little-used items.

But the Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) charged with administering the scheme had to destroy many thousands of mattresses, wardrobes, bed frames, and chairs after dumping them in damp and filthy warehouses in Renfrew.

A source at the GHA said: “It is a disgrace that this has been allowed to happen. It highlights an almost unbelievable level of mismanagement on the part of the GHA bosses.

This equipment was supposed to be distributed to poor and vulnerable families after the Games, but instead, the vast bulk of it is completely unusable.

There is not a single item that I would have in my house as a result of the damage that has been caused, it is all infested.”

Full story here:
https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/wasted-legacy-commonwealth-games-furniture-6263683

 

afternote: Francesca Osowska was promoted further and went on to work with David Mundell in a lead role with the UK Government of Scotland during and after the 2014 Independence Referendum. And that’s another story.

 

 

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Francesca Osowska – Elite Civil Servant Seemingly Accountable Only to the Cabinet Secretary in London

 

 

Francesca Osowska – The Early Years

Osowska was raised in Cumbria and privately schooled in her primary years but had to transfer to Wyndam Comprehensive to complete her secondary education.

She was an exemplary student who confounded critics of the local authority education system by achieving grades good enough to take her to Cambridge University where she gained an MA in Economics. A qualification to which she added an MA in European Economics from the College of Europe in Bruges.

In 1993 she joined the civil service as an economist and worked in the Employment Department in Sheffield for a time before taking up similar posts in London, Brussels, and Edinburgh, with the Scottish Office.

In 1998 she transferred her skills to mainstream civil service and joined the Scottish Office Education Department before going on to the Justice Department after which she was promoted Head of the Sports Department.

She took a long sabbatical from the Civil Service to pursue her love of athletics where her performances in the “Triathlon” and similar events were of the “Olympic” standard. A tough lady, she could run like the wind, swim like a fish, and cycle faster than a roadrunner. But injuries took their toll.

 

Principal Private Secretary (PPS) to Alex Salmond

She returned to the Civil Service and was fast-tracked by Westminster to the rank of “Elite” civil servant. This small group of civil servants pledges their allegiance to the Director of the Civil Service, who, reports to the Prime Minister and leads the Cabinet Office in London.

From then on, regardless of deployment, her loyalty was and still is to the “Elite” team and its leader. In 2007 she was installed as PPS to the First Minister, Alex Salmond, retaining the post until late 2009.

 

 

Osowska Takes a Dig at Alex Salmond

On 28 November 2017, only a few weeks after taking up the greatest challenge to her organizational abilities she elected to be interviewed by the Glasgow Herald and opened up with a negative assessment of her time as PPS to Alex Salmond from 2007-2009.

The reporter wrote:

“Francesca Osowska has some pretty big challenges to wrestle with, in her new job as chief executive of Scottish Natural Heritage. Should we reintroduce wolves and lynx to Scotland? Should the controversial culling of wild hares continue? Can we save the capercaillie? But none of the critical questions about Scotland’s iconic species quite compares to her days wrestling with one of the big beasts of politics. The former First Minister Alex Salmond. The subject of Salmond cropped up while Osowska and were talking about her impressive career in government and the civil service. Osowska has been, among other things, an economist at the Scottish Office, Director for the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, and head of the UK Government in Scotland.

But when asked what the lowest point of her career was, she said it was her time as Principal Private Secretary to Alex Salmond. She then said she would need to be extra careful about what she said next and paused for a bit before saying:

“There were times when I was working as Principal Private Secretary to the former First Minister Alex Salmond which were challenging,” (with a heavy emphasis on the word challenge.) I would find myself at Bute House at midnight in front of my computer thinking oh s**t, how am going to resolve this by 8am? Long hours. Challenging issues.”

There’s no doubt that, after years in the civil service, Osowska is used to working in stressful environments at the highest levels. Indeed, if anything, her new post at Scottish Natural Heritage ramps up the stress even further. Full report here:

https://www.heraldscotland.com/life_style/15687702.alex-salmond-and-francesca-osowska-wrestling-with-politics-big-beast/

 

The Commonwealth Games

In December 2009 she was promoted to the role of Director for Culture, External Affairs, and Tourism with responsibility for developing Scotlands bid for the Commonwealth Games.

Her sales pitch: https://www.surf.scot/scotregen/ensuring-a-lasting-legacy-from-2014-commonwealth-games-2/

Her links to the secretive “Common Purpose” networking organization allowed her to create “33Fifty” a group of young right-wing leaders of the future who would later participate in the conduct of the games in partnership with the Royal Commonwealth Society.

Another promotion came her way in January 2013 when she was appointed to the post of Director for the Commonwealth Games.

In addition to coordinating the work of a large team of senior officers and political figures, with a multitude of skills and agendas she was given a specific remit to regenerate the East End of Glasgow and to ensure the delivery of a lasting legacy for Scotland.

This she duly did and for which in January 2015, she was awarded an OBE, for services to Government and the Commonwealth Games Committee in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list.

 

 

The Commonwealth Games Legacy 2019

Regeneration and Physical Fitness

A major selling point of the Games was the promise of a significant and sustained increase in physical activity within the community as residents flocked to and used the many new sports facilities available to them.

But a study by “GoWell East” found the number of physically active locals had fallen from 62 percent in 2012 to just over 50 percent four years after the Games finished.

Halls and other facilities were demolished as part of the regeneration of the area and replaced with a sparkling new facility named the “Legacy Hub” which cost around £4m to build.

Four years on from the games, plagued by corruption and malfeasance the “Hub” shut its doors. Another Commonwealth Games venture that had failed to deliver the much-vaunted “Games Legacy.”

Full story here:
https://caltonjock.com/2016/03/02/fraud-corruption-in-public-office-glasgows-commonwealth-games-legacy/
https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/14324335.glasgow-labour-councillor-behind-troubled-commonwealth-games-project-put-on-leaveamid-finance-probe/
https://caltonjock.com/2016/03/02/fraud-corruption-in-public-office-glasgows-commonwealth-games-legacy/

 Dalmarnock in 2008 sees a playpark and trees

Dalmarnock before the games

 But in 2019 things look no better

 

Same view four years after the games

 

Large areas of the Dalmarnock community housing estate were razed to the ground because they were unsightly and residents, in some cases were forcibly removed from their properties under compulsory purchase orders greatly undervaluing the housing.

Many residents were relocated to similar run down pre-war properties outwith Dalmarnock with some finding accommodation after the games in the new housing stock built to house the games athletes.

Four years on Dalmarnock is still an eyesore and as shabby and derelict is as it ever was. Local residents complain that their community has lost its heart with the closure of just about all of its corner shops and other amenities. The much-vaunted investment in the future had proved to be a crock of s**t.

A local councillor admitted the promised improvements had not materialized and the community was hopelessly split between residents of “old Dalmarnock” those of the new village (previously the athletes’ accommodation.)

 

 

Improving the Lifestyle of Underprivileged Families

A key legacy of Glasgow 2014 was that thousands of mattresses, beds, wardrobes, and chairs from the athletes’ village were to be distributed to poor and vulnerable families. The scheme was announced to great fanfare prompting a long list of social housing clients to sign up in the hope of transforming their homes with little-used items.

But the Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) charged with administering the scheme had to destroy many thousands of mattresses, wardrobes, bed frames, and chairs after dumping them in damp and filthy warehouses in Renfrew.

Full story here: https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/wasted-legacy-commonwealth-games-furniture-6263683

A source at the GHA said: “It is a disgrace that this has been allowed to happen. It highlights an almost unbelievable level of mismanagement on the part of the GHA bosses. This equipment was supposed to be distributed to poor and vulnerable families after the Games, but instead, the vast bulk of it is completely unusable. There is not a single item that I would have in my house as a result of the damage that has been caused, it is all infested.”

 

Director Of The Office Of The UK Government Of Scotland

Her star continued to shine brightly with yet another promotion, in January 2015, to the post of “Director for the Scotland Office of the UK Government.”

Her new boss, David Mundell was delighted since she would be a catalyst ensuring successful implementation of the Westminster government’s plans to usurp the will of the Scottish people through an invidious extensive programme of change transferring financial and political responsibility away from Holyrood.

The role of the Scottish Office was defined by Mundell to be:

“To ensure the smooth working of the devolution settlement in Scotland. Representing Scottish interests within the UK Government and representing the UK Government in Scotland and ensuring that when it comes to reserved matters (the issues that the UK Government deals with in Scotland), the people of Scotland’s voice is heard at the highest level in UK Government.

Its objectives are:

To strengthen and sustain the union.
To act as a custodian of the devolution settlement.
To be Scotland’s voice in Whitehall.
To represent Scottish interests within Government and support the rest of Government on UK matters.
To champion the UK Government in Scotland
To represent and advocate for the UK Government’s policies and achievements in Scotland.

Alex Salmond and Francesca Osowska: wrestling with politics' big beast |  HeraldScotland

 

 

The Scottish Affairs Committee Interview Mundell and Osowska

The committee took evidence from Mundell, Secretary of State for Scotland, and senior civil servants at the Scotland Office, as they scrutinized the department’s annual report and accounts.

Pete Wishart: Opened the meeting referring to the misconduct of Mundell’s predecessor and Osowska’s former boss Alistair Carmichael, who was fighting claims arising from the “Frenchgate” affair that he had broken electoral law by lying about his role in a leak from the Scotland Office of the content of a private conversation between Nicola Sturgeon and the French consul, apparently reported by a civil servant to his line manager.

The written record allegedly contained a statement reporting that Nicola Sturgeon had voiced her support for the return of the Tory Party to Government. Nicola Sturgeon immediately dismissed the report.

Asked to comment Mundell, who was Carmichael’s number two at the time said he had no part in the leaking of the memo but declined to confirm or deny he had seen it prior to the leak. He said:

“I am Scotland’s voice in Whitehall and my team’s job is to make sure that Scotland’s voice is heard in decisions that are made in Whitehall in the Government. We are also the voice and ears of the UK Government in Scotland because Scotland has two governments. It’s wholly appropriate that the views of both governments are heard but also that we engage widely in relation to the activities of the UK Government in Scotland.”

Wishart questioned Mundell further, asking:

“Were you aware of the requirement for civil servants to record and submit reports to their manager about conversations between Ministers of the Scottish Government and other persons?

Mundell did not answer directly replying:

“The inquiry report set out that in terms of the actions of the civil servants involved there was no impropriety on their part and I had no part in the leaking of that memo.”

Wishart followed up, asking:

“We know you had nothing to do with the making of the leak and that the inquiry has been conducted and concluded, but did you see the memo?”

Ever evasive, Mundell stonewalled replying testily:

“All the relevant information in relation to the leak is contained in the Cabinet Office report.”

Wishart asked Osowska: “How common is it for “Scotland Office” civil servants to contact overseas governments to ask about private conversations between governments and Scottish Government ministers and to compile reports.

Osowska replied: “It is common practice for my staff to be in touch with the consular corps in Scotland and to keep Whitehall fully informed of conversations between Holyrood ministers and foreign diplomats.

It was later revealed that Mundell had issued an edict curtailing direct dialogue between Scottish Government Ministers and their counterparts in London. The Scottish Office would be copied all correspondence and records of any contacts.

Effectively establishing the Westminster Government of Scotland in Edinburgh, just up the road from Holyrood with himself self-appointed to the role of Scotlands Consular General.

Video Diary, Day Two: Francesca Osowska, Scottish Government, UK -  CSCLeaders (Part One) 2013 on Vimeo

 

Scottish Affairs Committee Meeting – Financial matters – Scotland Office

Francesca Osowska, Director and Principal Accounting Officer for the Scotland Office and the Office of the Advocate General attended to answer questions pertaining to the financial performance of both bodies.

Osowska: “The whole time equivalent establishment (WTE) for both units is around 100. Very few posts are filled with permanent staff the preference being to operate with the assistance of civil service staff seconded from departments at Westminster.”

Margaret Ferrier: “The 2015-16 budget for the Scotland Office, set in the 2013 spending round, was £5.8 million. But the most recent spending estimate asked the Treasury to approve the allocation of a further £3m for “capability enhancement.” What are these new funds for?”

Osowska: “The total combined outturn for the Office of the Advocate General and the Scotland Office in 2014/15 was £7.7 million. The notional £2m overspend was largely offset by an uplift to the allocation set in the 2010 spending round which had not budgeted for the 2014 Independence Referendum. The increased expenditure can mainly be attributed to the referendum which included an allocation of resources to Ministers and their support staff and commercial contractors who provided information to the Scottish public informing the debate.”

Margaret Ferrier: “These public Ministers, are you meaning UK Ministers?”

Osowska: “Yes.”

Margaret Ferrier: “Not the Scottish Government?”

Osowska: “No.”

Kirsty Blackman: “So the Scotland Office had allocated to it and spent an extra £3 million helping UK Government Ministers with information about the referendum, mainly?”

Osowska: “I do not think it is entirely correct to say it was a single jump of £3 million. In terms of what the money delivered and the outcomes that the Scotland Office delivered, I would refer the Committee to the report which sets out a detailed analysis of the outcomes and the outputs from the five objectives set by the Scotland Office, and certainly part of that work and a focus of that work in 2014-15 was in relation to the run-up and then the after-events—including the Smith Commission—of the referendum.”

Chair: “It would be helpful if you write to the Committee to explain properly what the £3.3 million did account for. What we are hearing is that this might have been finance used for “Better Together” in the referendum campaign, and used by UK Ministers and their staff enabling their participation in the referendum campaign. Would that be roughly a correct characterization of that spending?”

Osowska: I don’t think it would be. What I am saying is that in terms of general administration costs, the spend has been consistently around £7m. In answer to your question, “Was this a way of the Government funding the ‘No’ campaign?”. The finance was used to fund the activities of UK Government civil servants, in line with the civil service code. And I can tell you that all activities undertaken by civil servants in my Department would meet a propriety test, yet I think you would agree that in the run-up to a referendum, obviously when Ministers want to be more visible, when we need to ensure that there is a good flow of public information for example, via the Scotland analysis papers that increase our activity and that is why there was an increase between the 2013-14 out-turn and 2014-15 out-turn.”

The statement was later revealed to be absolute tosh with this revelation from the Cabinet Office in London.

 

The Devolved Countries Unit – Nobbled the Scots

The Westminster Civil Service, “Devolved Countries Unit”, (Dirty Tricks) campaign team won “special” Cabinet Secretary and Head of the Civil Service Awards.

The three amigos’s who actually run the UK: Sir Jeremy Heywood, Sir Bob Kerslake, and Sir Nicholas McPherson collaborated and plotted against Scotland marshalling the full resource of the civil service attacking the Scottish government and anyone who supported the “Yes” campaign.

In the months after the referendum, they expressed great satisfaction that their “Campaign of fear” had created “fearties” in numbers sufficient to win the day for the Unionist coalition.

An award, in recognition of the team’s outstanding achievement, making a significant difference on an issue of national significance, (the Referendum) was presented by the Cabinet Secretary and civil service head Sir Jeremy Heywood. The proud team commented:

* Paul Doyle: “This award is not just for the Treasury, it’s for all the hard work that was done by all government departments on the Scotland agenda. The reality was in all my experience of the civil service, I have never seen the civil service pull together in the way they did behind supporting the UK government in maintaining the United Kingdom. It was a very special event for all of us.”

* William MacFarlane: Deputy Director at HM Treasury, (Budget and Tax Strategy): “As civil servants, you don’t get involved in politics. But for the first time in my life, suddenly we’re part of a political campaign. We were doing everything from the analysis to the advertising, to the communications. I just felt a massive sense of being part of the operation. This being recognized [at the Civil Service Awards], makes me feel just incredibly proud.”

* Shannon Cochrane: “we’ve learned that it is possible for civil servants to work on things that are inherently political and quite difficult, and you’re very close to the line of what is appropriate, but it’s possible to find your way through and to make a difference.”

* Mario Pisani: Deputy Director at HM Treasury, (Public Policy): “In the Treasury, everyone hates you. We don’t get thanks for anything. This is one occasion where we’ve worked with the rest of Whitehall. We all had something in common, we’re trying to save the Union here, and it was so close. We just kept it by the skin of our teeth. I actually cried when the result came in. After 10 years in the civil service, my proudest moment is tonight and receiving this award. As civil servants, you don’t get involved in politics. But, for the first time in my life, suddenly we’re part of a political campaign. We were doing everything from the analysis to the advertising, to the communications. I just felt a massive sense of being part of the operation. This being recognized [at the Civil Service Awards], makes me feel just incredibly proud.”

Comment: The “Civil Service Code” obliges all civil servants to be strictly apolitical and political campaigning work such as described is expressly forbidden. But the Cabinet Secretary, Heywood instructed civil servants to ignore the long-standing protocol and actively conspire to defeat Scots who wished to be free of Westminster control. What is particularly galling is that Francesca Osowska’s office funded all of it using finance that had been allocated to Scotland. Her statement that all activities completed for the Scotland Office, by Westminster civil servants would pass a propriety test stretches incredulity.

Much More here:

https://caltonjock.com/2016/01/27/scottish-office-works-for-westminster-but-against-scotland/
https://caltonjock.com/2016/03/15/2014-scottish-referendum-state-subversion-denied-scots-their-freedom-next-time-we-will-be-wiser/
https://caltonjock.com/2017/07/24/mundell-and-the-tory-party-actively-aided-by-the-scottish-office-are-the-legal-government-of-scotland-holyrood-politicians-need-to-be-mindful-of-this-or-westminster-will-shut-it-down/
https://caltonjock.com/2016/01/28/i-dont-want-to-appear-evasive-but-francesca-osowska-director-of-the-scottish-office-runs-rings-around-the-scottish-affairs-committee-in-defence-of-her-boss-david-mundell/
https://caltonjock.com/2016/02/24/the-unashamed-unionist-civil-servant-francesca-osowska-a-master-in-the-art-of-obfuscation-denies-scots-their-freedom-from-the-tyranical-westminster-elite-fulfilling-its-political-agenda-at-every-jun/
https://caltonjock.com/2020/08/28/francesca-osowska-a-well-earned-obe-you-be-the-judge/
https://bellacaledonia.wordpress.com/2015/04/05/false-memos-and-french-farce/

Labour still isn’t working for Glasgow and has left a poisoned legacy

 

 

Scottish National Heritage

In October 2017, in a surprise move, Osowska was seconded (for 3 years, maximum 2 terms) to the Scottish National Heritage Department as its Chief Executive replacing the incumbent, Ian Jardine, who was seconded (for 3 years, maximum 2 terms) to a newly created role, with the Scottish Government, as a National Adviser on environment policy with a remit to strengthen its EU-related analysis, engagement, and policy work.

Promoting the change, Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said:

“I am delighted to approve the appointment of Francesca Osowska as chief executive of Scottish Natural Heritage. Francesca’s wealth of experience in leading transformational change and government policy should be a great asset to SNH, and I look forward to working with her. I also wish to pay tribute to Ian Jardine for his leadership of SNH over many years and I am very pleased that our work on future environment policy and regulation will gain from his extensive knowledge and experience, including of the European Union.”

Ian Jardine – Natural Heritage – Qualifications and Experience

Holds a Bachelor’s degree in Ecology and a Doctorate in Zoology.

Began his public service career in 1984 in the Scottish Office, working successively on urban renewal, housing policy, criminal justice, and industrial policy.

Joined the Nature Conservancy Council for Scotland in 1991 as Regional Director and remained in that role with the formation of SNH in 1992.

Appointed Chief Executive of SNH in 2002.

Served on the Council of the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland 2005-2008.

President of Eurosite, a network for organizations managing protected areas in Europe, 2007-2010.

Member of ENCA (European Nature Conservation Agencies).

Worked with Europarc and IUCN/WCPA, including as a member of the World Protected Areas Leadership Forum

Francesca Orloska – Natural Heritage Qualifications and Experience

None.

Comment: Giving Osowska  charge of a budget  in excess of £75m and management of a very large number of staff attracted criticism.

Both officers are still in place supporting the view that they will remain in their present posts until 2024.

Indeed it is feasible that one day soon they will be given peerages and a cushy well-renumerated lifestyle in the House of Lords.

 

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Blair and His Cronies Dictated Operational Policy in Afghanistan With Result That British Casualties in Afghanistan Were Four Times Higher Than US Forces- A Heartbreaking Record of Incompetence

 

 

Taliban militants kill police chief in Helmand province of Afghanistan - world news - Hindustan Times

 

 

Afghanistan 

In October 2001, UK forces entered Afghanistan in support of the United States. In a statement to the House of Commons, on 4 October 2001, Blair outlined the UK’s objectives, stating:

“We must bring Bin Laden and other Al Qaeda leaders to justice and eliminate the terrorist threat they pose.  And we must ensure that Afghanistan ceases to harbour and sustain international terrorism. If the Taliban regime will not comply with that objective, we must bring about change in that regime to ensure that Afghanistan’s links to international terrorism are broken.

We will do what we can to minimize the suffering of the Afghan people as a result of the conflict; and we commit ourselves to work with them afterwards inside and outside Afghanistan to ensure a better, more peaceful future, free from the repression and dictatorship that is their present existence. The Afghan people are not our enemy, for they have our sympathy and they will have our support.

Our enemy is Osama bin Laden and the al-Qaeda network, who were responsible for the events of 11 September. The Taliban regime must yield them up or become our enemy also. We will not act for revenge. We will act because we need to for the protection of our people and our way of life, including confidence in our economy.

The threat posed by bin Laden and his terrorism must be eliminated. We act for justice. We act with world opinion behind us and we have an absolute determination to see justice done and this evil of mass international terrorism confronted and defeated.

 

Tony Blair: military intervention in rogue regimes 'more necessary than ever' | Tony Blair | The Guardian

 

 

 

Helmand

In May 2006, their was a sharp increase in the number of attacks on Afghan forces and the US decided to expand its operations throughout Afghanistan.

In the year that followed American casualties escalated and Blair committed an increased number of UK forces to assist them in the troubled Helmand province.

By the midsummer of 2007,  British personnel in Afghanistan had been doubled to approximately 7000.

In a statement on 26 January 2006, the then Secretary of State for Defence, John Reid, told Parliament:

“The UK will work to ensure that we provide Afghanistan with a seamless package of democratic, political, developmental and military assistance. In fact, all of that is necessary to ensure that international terrorism never again has a base in Afghanistan.”

In March 2006, on a flying visit to Afghanistan, in an interview he said:

“If we are here for three years and accomplish our mission without firing a shot, we will be very happy indeed”

 

John 'without a shot being fired' Reid's £50,000 Iraq security job | Daily Mail Online

 

 

About Helmand 

Afghanistan is the world’s chief exporter of opium and narcotics production is the controlling factor of the Helmand economy. The trade is protected by well organized armed “gangs” controlled and financed by a number of mafia inspired-like organisations who did not tolerate any interference in their operations. The “druglords” who were not the “Taliban” had the money and the means to defend their assets.

Not long after arriving in Helmand in 2006, British forces were tasked to support a major anti-narcotics programme facilitating the Afghan Government’s control of the province. This brought about an early confrontation with the narcotics druglords who protected their vested interests with the support of corrupt officials, police officers and translators. It also alienated and inspired the resistance of many local tribesmen who had long suffered hardship imposed on them by the very officials the British forces were providing back-up for. The terminology is “shooting oneself in the foot.”

The Taliban had observed that Western forces were bogged down in Iraq and troop numbers had not increased in Afghanistan in more than three years. They used the vacumn to launch a campaign of terror in Helmand through the intimidation and kidnapping and murder of local leaders and their families. Their programmes of disruption also extended to the destruction of schools and building projects put in place by local government.

The Taliban also recruited thousands of volunteers, many from Pakistani Madrassahs (schools of radical Islamic teaching)

 

Taliban says it is resuming offensive operations against Afghan forces - Business Insider

 

 

Operational Deployment of British Forces Decided by Blair –  Casualty Rates Escalate

The  Governor of Helmand insisted that British forces protect towns throughout the province. Refusing his request the British forces commander told him he did not have the personnel numbers needed to support the strategy but following high level political meetings he was ordered from Westminster to accede to the wishes of the Governor. The demands of their political masters would have serious repercussions on the soldiers on the ground.

His forces were split into units numbering between 40-100 and deployed to defend the towns of Sangin, Musa Qala, Nawzad and Garmsir and other places from small poorly built fortified bases.

The deployment played right into the hands of the Taliban who surrounded and relentlessly attacked the bases for days on end inflicting significant casualties on the British defenders without much loss to themselves.

Another aspect of the fight on many fronts was the presence in the Taliban of a large number of Madrassah supported Pakistanis.

The Madrassah’s were also heavily involved in the education, training and deployment to the UK of radicalized sleepers, individuals who would become terrorists in the UK.

Blair ordered the adoption of a “velvet glove” policy on Madrassahs so that British secret services could work with the Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence agency (ISI) ensuring the protection of the British homeland.

His policy did not endear him to military commanders in Afghanistan who were acutely aware that the (ISI) played both sides and were not trusted allies in the fight against the Taliban.

 

British troops in Afghanistan: the heavy toll of Helmand casualties | World news | The Guardian

 

Summary:

Blair and those that followed him in office ensured the British public did not have an informed understanding of the objectives of their armed forces deployment to Afghanistan. Many thought the fighting was all about the control of poppy production, while others thought it was about the War on Terror, (which the Taliban had no part in). Those that were politically briefed knew it was all about the US and Britain imposing democracy and governance of on a troubled nation.

 

Afghan casualty rate 'at level of last war'

 

 

 

Casualties of the War in Afghanistan

453 British soldiers died in Afghanistan – four times the rate of US troops, a statistical disparity which nobody at Westminster has yet explained

The maximum acceptable level of major combat casualties is 6 deaths per 1000. UK forces suffered 13 deaths per 1000. (The average age of those who died was 22. 31 were teenagers, 200 in their 20s). USA forces suffered 3 deaths per 1000.

3560 soldiers were wounded in action. 29 British soldiers had limbs amputated in 2012-2013. 12 were classified as “significant multiple amputees”.

Of the army veterans who made it home more or less in one piece, suicide was the most common cause of death in 2012.

 

The Taliban in Afghanistan

 

Eyes Shut and Fingers Crossed

Major General Mackay, Greatly respected, Force Commander in Helmand, (in an interview in the Times), not long after he left the Army said;

“Labour’s “complacent” approach to the Afghan mission had proved “very costly”. The genesis of their approach is born of complacency, the thought that, ‘we can deal with it as and when it happens”. It resulted, I believe, in the upper echelons of the Labour government going into Helmand with their eyes shut and their fingers crossed.

“For those who fought and died or suffered injuries in that period, this proved a very costly means of conducting counter-insurgency. The issue is whether or not our politicians, diplomats, intelligence services, civil servants and senior military have done enough, adapted enough, been innovative enough or courageous enough to make tough, and more often than not, unpalatable choices.”

“My answer to that question is that they have not or have failed to do so too often. Muddling through seemed to be the default setting, along with the protection of individual and collective interests”.

 

Paul Flynn MP – Defender of Scotland – The Best MP in Westminster

 

House of Commons – Early Day Motion Submitted by Welsh Labour MP Paul Flynn

That this House records its sorrow at the deaths of 453 British soldiers in Afghanistan and notes the post-conflict judgments by Brigadier Ed Butler that the UK was under-prepared and under-resourced, by General Sir Peter Wall that the calculus was wrong, by former ambassador Sir Sherard Cowper-Coles that the UK operation was a massive act of collective self-deception by military and politicians unable to admit how badly it was going, and by General Lord Dannatt that the UK knew it was heading for two considerable size operations and really only had the organisation and manpower for one; and calls for an early inquiry into the conduct of the war in order to avoid future blunders.

What a shame they could bear to tell the truth earlier when many lives could have been saved.

http://www.paulflynnmp.co.uk/

Commando medics ready for contingency operations - GOV.UK

 

 

453 UK soldiers died in Afghanistan following the decision by the Westminster Unionists to invade Helmand in 2006.

Captain Thomas Clarke, aged 30, from Cardiff, Flight Lieutenant Rakesh Chauhan, aged 29, from Birmingham, Warrant Officer Class 2 Spencer Faulkner, aged 38, Corporal James Walters, aged 36, from Cornwall, Lance Corporal Oliver Thomas, aged 26, from Brecon, Sapper Adam Moralee, aged 23, from Newcastle, Captain Richard Holloway, aged 29, from Durham, Warrant Officer Class 2 Ian Fisher, aged 42, from Essex, Lance Corporal James Brynin, The Intelligence Corps, aged 22, from Shoreham-by-Sea, Flight Lieutenant Steven Johnson, aged 38, from Collingham, Nottinghamshire, Flight Lieutenant Leigh Anthony Mitchelmore, aged 28, from Bournemouth, Flight Lieutenant Gareth Rodney Nicholas, aged 40, from Newquay, Cornwall, Flight Lieutenant Allan James Squires, aged 39, from Clatterbridge, Flight Lieutenant Steven Swarbrick, aged 28, from Liverpool, Flight Sergeant Gary Wayne Andrews, aged 48, from Tankerton, Kent, Flight Sergeant Stephen Beattie, aged 42, from Dundee, Flight Sergeant Gerard Martin Bell, aged 48, from Ely, Cambridgeshire, Flight Sergeant Adrian Davies, aged 49, from Amersham, Buckinghamshire, Sergeant Benjamin James Knight, aged 25, from Bridgwater, Sergeant John Joseph Langton, aged 29, from Liverpool, Sergeant Gary Paul Quilliam, aged 42, from Manchester, Corporal Oliver Simon Dicketts, The Parachute Regiment, aged 27, Marine Joseph David Windall, Royal Marines, aged 22, Corporal William Thomas Savage, aged 30, from Irvine, Fusilier Samuel Flint, aged 21, from Blackpool, Private Robert Murray Hetherington, from the United States of America, Lance Corporal Jamie Webb, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 24, from Wythenshawe, Kingsman David Robert Shaw, 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 23, from Barrow-in-Furness, Sapper Richard Reginald Walker, 28 Engineer Regiment, aged 23, from Leeds, Captain Walter Barrie, 1 Scots, aged 41, from Glasgow, Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 29, from County Durham, Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 28, from Pokhara, Nepal, Corporal David O’Connor, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 27, from Havant, Hampshire, Corporal Channing Day, 3 Medical Regiment, aged 25, from Newtownards, County Down, Captain Carl Manley, Royal Marines, aged 41, Captain James Anthony Townley, Corps of Royal Engineers, aged 29, from Tunbridge Wells, Sergeant Jonathan Eric Kups, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 38, from Nuneaton, Warwickshire, Sergeant Gareth Thursby, 3 Yorks, aged 29, from Skipton, Private Thomas Wroe, 3 Yorks, aged 18, from Huddersfield, Lance Corporal Duane Groom, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 32, from Suva City, Fiji, Sergeant Lee Paul Davidson, The Light Dragoons, aged 32, from Doncaster, and Guardsman Karl Whittle, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22, from Bristol.Corporal Jack Leslie Stanley, The Queen’s Royal Hussars, aged 26, from Bolton, Sergeant Luke Taylor, The Royal Marines, aged 33, from Bournemouth, Lance Corporal Michael Foley, Adjutant General’s Corps (Staff and Personnel Support), aged 25, from Burnley, Lancashire, Captain Rupert William Michael Bowers, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 24, from Wolverhampton, Sergeant Nigel Coupe, 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 33, from Lytham St. Annes, Lancashire, Corporal Jake Hartley, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 20, from Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, Private Anthony Frampton, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 20, from Huddersfield, Private Christopher Kershaw, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 19, from Bradford, Private Daniel Wade, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 20, from Warrington, Private Daniel Wilford, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 21, from Huddersfield, Senior Aircraftman Ryan Tomlin, 2 Squadron RAF Regiment, aged 21, from Hemel Hempstead, Lance Corporal Gajbahadur Gurung, Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 26, from Majthana, Nepal, Signaller Ian Gerard Sartorius-Jones, 20th Armoured Brigade Headquarters and Signal Squadran (200), aged 21, from Runcorn, Cheshire, Rifleman Sachin Limbu, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 23, from Rajghat, Morang, Nepal, Private John King, 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 19, from Darlington, Squadron Leader Anthony Downing, Royal Air Force, aged 34, from Kent and Captain Tom Jennings, Royal Marines, aged 29. Guardsman Jamie Shadrake, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 20, from Wrexham, Wales, Lance Corporal Matthew David Smith, Corps of Royal Engineers, aged 26, from Aldershot, Lieutenant Andrew Robert Chesterman, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 26, from Guildford, Warrant Officer Class 2 Leonard Perran Thomas, Royal Corps of Signals, aged 44, from Ross-on-Wye, Guardsman Craig Andrew Roderick, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 22, from Cardiff, Guardsman Apete Saunikalou Ratumaiyale Tuisovurua, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 28, from Fiji, Corporal Alex Guy, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 37, from St Neots, Cambridgeshire, Lance Corporal James Ashworth, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 23, from Kettering, Private Gregg Thomas Stone, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 20, from Yorkshire, Corporal Michael John Thacker, 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh, aged 27, from Swindon, Wiltshire, Captain Stephen James Healey, 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh, aged 29, from Cardiff, Corporal Brent John McCarthy, Royal Air Force, aged 25, from Priorslee, Telford, Lance Corporal Lee Thomas Davies, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 27, from Carmarthen, Corporal Andrew Steven Roberts, 23 Pioneer Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps, aged 32, from Middlesbrough, Private Ratu Manasa Silibaravi, 23 Pioneer Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps, aged 32, from Fiji, Guardsman Michael Roland, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22, from Worthing and Sapper Connor Ray, 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), aged 21, from Newport. Sapper Elijah Bond, 35 Engineer Regiment Royal Engineers, aged 24, from St Austell, Rifleman Sheldon Lee Jordan Steel, 5th Battalion The Rifles, aged 20, from Leeds, Private Thomas Christopher Lake, 1st Battalion The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, aged 29, from Watford, Lieutenant David Boyce, 1st The Queen’s Dragoon Guards, aged 25, from Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, Lance Corporal Richard Scanlon, 1st The Queen’s Dragoons Guards, aged 31, from Rhymney, Gwent, Lance Corporal Peter Eustace, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 25, from Liverpool, Private Matthew Thornton, 4th Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 28, from Barnsley, Private Matthew James Sean Haseldin, 2nd Battalion The Mercia Regiment, aged 21, from Settle, Yorkshire, Rifleman Vijay Rai, 2nd Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 21, from the Bhojpur District, Deaurali East of Nepal, Marine David Fairbrother, Kilo Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 24, from Blackburn, Lance Corporal Jonathan James McKinley, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 33, from Darlington, County Durham, Sergeant Barry John Weston, Kilo Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 40, from Reading, Lieutenant Daniel John Clack, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 24, from North London, Marine James Robert Wright, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 22, from Weymouth and Corporal Mark Anthony Palin, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 32, from Plymouth. Lance Corporal Paul Watkins, 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales’s), aged 24, from Port Elizabeth, Republic of South Africa, Highlander Scott McLaren, The Highlanders 4th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 20, from Edinburgh, Private Gareth Leslie William Bellingham, 3rd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Stafford), aged 22, from Stoke-on-Trent, Corporal Lloyd Newell, The Parachute Regiment, Craftsman Andrew Found, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 27, from Whitby, Rifleman Martin Jon Lamb, 1st Battalion the Rifles, aged 27, from Gloucester, Lance Corporal Martin Joseph Gill, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 22, from Nottingham, Corporal Michael John Pike, The Highlanders 4th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 26, from Huntly, Scotland, Lieutenant Oliver Richard Augustin, Juliet Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Kent, Marine Samuel Giles William Alexander MC, Juliet Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 28, from London, Colour Sergeant Kevin Charles Fortuna, A Company, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 36, from Cheltenham, Marine Nigel Dean Mead, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 19, from Carmarthen, Captain Lisa Jade Head, 11 EOD Regiment RLC, aged 29, from Huddersfield, Colour Sergeant Alan Cameron, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 42, from Livingston, Scotland, Major Matthew James Collins, 1st Battalion Irish Guards, aged 38, from Backwell, Somerset, Lance Sergeant Mark Terence Burgan, 1st Battalion Irish Guards, aged 28, from Liverpool, Private Daniel Steven Prior, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 27, from Peacehaven, East Sussex, Lance Corporal McKee, 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment, aged 27, from Banbridge, County Down, Northern Ireland, Lance Corporal Liam Richard Tasker, Royal Army Veterinary Corps, aged 26, from Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland, Private Robert Wood, 17 Port and Maritime Regiment Royal Logistic Corps, aged 28, from Hampshire, Private Dean Hutchinson, 9 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps, aged 23, from Wiltshire, Lance Corporal Kyle Cleet Marshall, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 23, from Newcastle, Private Lewis Hendry, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 20, from Norwich, Private Conrad Lewis, 4th Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 22, from Bournemouth, Warrant Officer Class 2 (Company Sergeant Major) Colin Beckett, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 36, from Peterborough, Ranger David Dalzell, 1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Regiment, aged 20, from Bangor County Down, Private Martin Simon George Bell, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 24, from Bradford, Private Joseva Saqanagonedau Vatubua, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 24, from Suva, Fiji, Warrant Officer Class 2 Charles Henry Wood, 23 Pioneer Regiment Royal Logistic Corps, serving with the Counter-Improvised Explosive Device Task Force, aged 34, from Middlesbrough, and Corporal Steven Thomas Dunn, 216 (Parachute) Signal Squadron, attached to 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment Battlegroup, aged 27, from Gateshead. Private John Howard, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 23, from Wellington, New Zealand, Guardsman Christopher Davies, 1st Battalion Irish Guards, aged 22, from St Helens, Merseyside, Ranger Aaron McCormick, 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment, aged 22, from Coleraine in County Londonderry, Senior Aircraftsman Scott ‘Scotty’ Hughes, 1 Squadron Royal Air Force Regiment, aged 20, from North Wales, Sapper William Bernard Blanchard, 101 (City of London) Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), aged 39, from Gosport, Hampshire, Corporal David Barnsdale, 33 Engineer Regiment, aged 24, from Tring, Sergeant Peter Anthony Rayner, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 34, from Bradford, Rifleman Suraj Gurung, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 22, from Gorkha in Nepal, Corporal Matthew Thomas, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Sergeant Andrew James Jones, Royal Engineers, aged 35, from Newport, South Wales, Trooper Andrew Martin Howarth, The Queen’s Royal Lancers, aged 20, from Bournemouth, Kingsman Darren Deady, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 22, from Bolton, Captain Andrew Griffiths, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 25, from Richmond, North Yorkshire, Lance Corporal Joseph McFarlane Pool, The Royal Scots Borderers 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 26, from Greenock, Lance Corporal Jordan Dean Bancroft, 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 25, from Burnley, Sapper Ishwor Gurung, 69 Gurkha Field Squadron, 21 Engineer Regiment, aged 21, from Pokhara, Nepal, Sapper Darren Foster, 21 Engineer Regiment, aged 20, from Carlisle, Rifleman Remand Kulung, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Cheshire), aged 27, from Nepal, Lietuenant John Charles Sanderson, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Cheshire), aged 29, from Oklahoma, USA, Marine Adam Brown, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 26, from Burtle, near Glastonbury, Lance Sergeant Dale Alanzo McCallum, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 31, from Hanover, Jamaica, Sapper Mark Antony Smith, 36 Engineer Regiment, aged 26, from Swanley, Kent, Corporal Matthew James Stenton, The Royal Dragoon Guards, aged 23, from Wakefield, Lance Corporal Stephen Daniel Monkhouse, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 28, from Greenock, Staff Sergeant Brett George Linley, The Royal Logistic Corps, aged 29, from Birmingham, Sergeant David Thomas Monkhouse, The Royal Dragoon Guards, aged 35, from Aspatria, Cumbria, Senior Aircraftman Kinikki ‘Griff’ Griffiths, aged 20, Marine Jonathan David Thomas Crookes, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 26, from Birmingham, Marine Matthew Harrison, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Hemel Hempstead, Major James Joshua Bowman, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 34, from Salisbury, Lieutenant Neal Turkington, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 26, from Craigavon, and Corporal Arjun Purja Pun, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 33, from Khibang village Magdi District, Nepal. Marine David Charles Hart, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Upper Poppleton, North Yorkshire, Bombardier Samuel Joseph Robinson, 5th Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 31, from Carmarthen, Private Thomas Sephton, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 20, from Warrington, Trooper James Anthony Leverett, Royal Dragoon Guards, aged 20, from Sheffield, Corporal Seth Stephens, Royal Marines, Corporal Jamie Kirkpatrick, 101 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), aged 32, from Llanelli, Bombardier Stephen Raymond Gilbert, 4th Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 36, from Topcliffe, North Yorkshire, Colour Sergeant Martyn Horton, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 34, from Runcorn, Lance Corporal David Ramsden, 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 26, from Leeds, Private Douglas Halliday, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 20, from Wallasey, Merseyside, Private Alex Isaac, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 20, from the Wirral, Sergeant Steven William Darbyshire, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 35, from Wigan, Lance Corporal Michael Taylor, Charlie Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 30, from Rhyl, Marine Paul Warren, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Leyland, Lancashire, Marine Richard Hollington, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Petersfield, Trooper Ashley Smith, Royal Dragoon Guards, aged 21, from York, Corporal Taniela Tolevu Rogoiruwai, aged 32, from Nausori, Fiji, Kingsman Pomipate Tagitaginimoce, aged 29, from Nausori, Fiji, and Marine Steven James Birdsall, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 20, from Warrington. Lance Corporal Andrew Breeze, B (Malta) Company, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Cheshire), aged 31, from Manchester, Private Jonathan Monk, 2nd Battalion The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, aged 25, from London, Lance Bombardier Mark Chandler, 3rd Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, aged 32, from Nailsworth, Gloucestershire, Corporal Terry Webster, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Cheshire), aged 24, from Chester, Lance Corporal Alan Cochran, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Cheshire), aged 23, from St Asaph, North Wales, Marine Anthony Dean Hotine, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 21, from Warminster, Marine Scott Gregory Taylor, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 20, from Buxton, Corporal Stephen Curley, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 26, from Exeter, Gunner Zak Cusack, 4th Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 20, from Stoke-on-Trent, Corporal Stephen Walker, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 42, from Lisburn, Northern Ireland, Corporal Christopher Lewis Harrison, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 26, from Watford, Sapper Daryn Roy, 21 Engineer Regiment, aged 28, from Consett, County Durham, Lance Corporal Barry Buxton, 21 Engineer Regiment, aged 27, from Meir, Stoke-on-Trent, Corporal Harvey Holmes, 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 22, from Hyde, Greater Manchester, Fusilier Jonathan Burgess, 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh, aged 20, from Townhill, Swansea, Rifleman Mark Turner, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 21, from Gateshead, Guardsman Michael Sweeney, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 19, from Blyth in Northumberland, Rifleman Daniel Holkham, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from Chatham, Kent, Lance Corporal of Horse Jonathan Woodgate, Household Cavalry Regiment, aged 26, from Lavenham, Suffolk, Sergeant Steven Campbell, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 30, from Durham, Lance Corporal Scott Hardy, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 26, from Chelmsford, Private James Grigg, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 20, from Hartismere, Suffolk, Captain Martin Driver, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 31, from Barnsley, Corporal Stephen Thompson, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 31, from Bovey Tracey, Devon, Lance Corporal Tom Keogh, 4th Battalion The Rifles, aged 24, from Paddington, London, Rifleman Liam Maughan, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 18, from Doncaster, Rifleman Jonathan Allott, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from North Shields, Corporal Richard Green, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 23, from Reading, Rifleman Carlo Apolis, 4th Battalion The Rifles, aged 28, from South Africa, Sergeant Paul Fox, 28 Engineer Regiment, aged 34, from St Ives, Rifleman Martin Kinggett, 4th Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from Dagenham, Senior Aircraftman Luke Southgate, II Squadron Royal Air Force Regiment, aged 20, from Bury St Edmunds, Lance Sergeant David ‘Davey’ Walker, 1st Battalion Scots Guards, aged 36, from Glasgow, Lieutenant Douglas Dalzell, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards from Berkshire and Sapper Guy Mellors, 36 Engineer Regiment, aged 20, from Coventry. Kingsman Sean Dawson, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 19, from Ashton-under-Lyne, Manchester, Rifleman Mark Marshall, 6th Battalion The Rifles, aged 29, from Exeter, Lance Sergeant Dave Greenhalgh, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 25, from Ilkeston, Derbyshire, Lance Corporal Darren Hicks, from Mousehole, Cornwall, Warrant Officer Class 2 David Markland, 36 Engineer Regiment, aged 36, from Euxton, Lancashire, Corporal John Moore, The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 22, from Lanarkshire, Private Sean McDonald, The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 26, from Edinburgh, Corporal Liam Riley, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 21, from Sheffield, Lance Corporal Graham Shaw, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 27, from Huddersfield, Lance Corporal Daniel Cooper, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 22, from Hereford, Rifleman Peter Aldridge, 4th Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, Corporal Lee Brownson, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 30, from Bishop Auckland, Rifleman Luke Farmer, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from Pontefract, Captain Daniel Reed, 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps, aged 32, from Rainham, Kent, Private Robert Hayes, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 19, from Cambridge, Sapper David Watson, 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), aged 23, Rifleman Aidan Howell, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from Sidcup, Kent, Lance Corporal Tommy Brown, The Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Christopher Roney, A Company, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 23, from Sunderland, Lance Corporal Michael David Pritchard, 4th Regiment, Royal Military Police, aged 22, from Maidstone, Corporal Simon Hornby, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 29, from Liverpool, Lance Corporal David Leslie Kirkness, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 24, from West Yorkshire, Rifleman James Stephen Brown, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 18, from Kent, Lance Corporal Adam Drane, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 23, from Bury St Edmunds, Acting Sergeant John Paxton Amer, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, from Sunderland, Sergeant Robert David Loughran-Dickson, 4th Regiment Royal Military Police, aged 33, from Deal, Kent, Corporal Loren Owen Christopher Marlton-Thomas, 33 Engineer Regiment (EOD), aged 28, Rifleman Andrew Ian Fentiman, 7th Battalion The Rifles, aged 23, from Cambridge, Rifleman Samuel John Bassett, 4th Battalion The Rifles, aged 20, from Plymouth, Rifleman Philip Allen, 2 Rifles, aged 20, from Dorset, Sergeant Phillip Scott, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, aged 30, from Malton, Warrant Officer Class 1 Darren Chant, 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards, aged 40, from Walthamstow, Sergeant Matthew Telford, 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards, aged 37, from Grimsby, Guardsman James Major, 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards, aged 18, from Grimsby, and Corporal Steven Boote, Royal Military Police, aged 22, from Birkenhead, Liverpool. Corporal Nicholas Webster-Smith, Royal Military Police, aged 24, from Glangwili, Staff Sergeant Olaf Sean George Schmid, Royal Logistic Corps, aged 30, from Truro, Corporal Thomas ‘Tam’ Mason, the Black Watch, 3rd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 27, from Rosyth, Corporal James Oakland, Royal Military Police, aged 26, from Manchester, Lance Corporal James Hill, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 23, from Redhill, Surrey, Guardsman James Janes, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 20, from Brighton, Acting Corporal Marcin Wojtak, 34 Squadron RAF regiment, aged 24, from Leicester, Private James Prosser, 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh, aged 21, from Cwmbran, Acting Sergeant Michael Lockett MC, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, from Monifieth in Angus, Acting Sergeant Stuart McGrath, 2nd Battalion, The Rifles, aged 28, from Buckinghamshire, Trooper Brett Hall, 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, aged 21, from Dartmouth, Kingsman Jason Dunn-Bridgeman, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, aged 20, from Liverpool, Corporal John Harrison, The Parachute Regiment, Private Gavin Elliott, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 19, from Woodsetts, Worksop, Nottinghamshire, Lance Corporal Richard Brandon, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 24, from Kidderminster, Sergeant Stuart ‘Gus’ Millar, The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 40, from Inverness, Private Kevin Elliott, The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 24, from Dundee, Sergeant Lee Andrew Houltram, Royal Marines. Fusilier Shaun Bush, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, aged 24, from Warwickshire, Sergeant Paul McAleese, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 29, from Hereford, Private Jonathon Young, 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Duke of Wellington’s), aged 18, from Hull, Lance Corporal James Fullarton, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, aged 24, from Coventry, Fusilier Simon Annis, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, from Salford, Fusilier Louis Carter, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, from Nuneaton, Sergeant Simon Valentine, aged 29, from Bedworth, Private Richard Hunt, 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh, aged 21, from Abergavenny, Captain Mark Hale, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 42, from Bournemouth, Lance Bombardier Matthew Hatton, 40th Regiment Royal Artillery (The Lowland Gunners), aged 23, from Easingwold, North Yorkshire, Rifleman Daniel Wild, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from Hartlepool, Private Jason George Williams, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 23, from Worcester, Corporal Kevin Mulligan, The Parachute Regiment, aged 26, Lance Corporal Dale Thomas Hopkins, The Parachute Regiment, aged 23, Private Kyle Adams, The Parachute Regiment, aged 21, Craftsman Anthony Lombardi, aged 21, from Scunthorpe, Trooper Phillip Lawrence, Light Dragoons, aged 22, from Birkenhead, Warrant Officer Class 2 Sean Upton, 5th Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 35, from Nottinghamshire and Bombardier Craig Hopson, 40th Regiment Royal Artillery (The Lowland Gunners), aged 24, from Castleford. Guardsman Christopher King, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, aged 20, from Birkenhead, Liverpool, Captain Daniel Shepherd, 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, The Royal Logistic Corps, aged 28, from Lincoln, Corporal Joseph Etchells, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, aged 22, from Mossley, Rifleman Aminiasi Toge, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 26, from Suva, Fiji, Corporal Jonathan Horne, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 28, from Walsall, Rifleman William Aldridge, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 18, from Bromyard, Herefordshire, Rifleman James Backhouse, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 18, from Castleford, Yorkshire, Rifleman Joe Murphy, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 18, from Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, Rifleman Daniel Simpson, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 20, from Croydon, Corporal Lee Scott, 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, aged 26, from King’s Lynn, Private John Brackpool, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 27, from Crawley, West Sussex, Rifleman Daniel Hume, 4th Battalion The Rifles, Trooper Christopher Whiteside, The Light Dragoons, aged 20, from Blackpool, Captain Ben Babington-Browne, 22 Engineer Regiment, Royal Engineers, aged 27, from Maidstone, Lance Corporal Dane Elson, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 22, from Bridgend, Lance Corporal David Dennis, The Light Dragoons, aged 29, from Llanelli, Wales, Private Robert Laws, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 18, from Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, Lieutenant Colonel Rupert Thorneloe MBE, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards and Trooper Joshua Hammond, 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, aged 18. Major Sean Birchall, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 33, Lieutenant Paul Mervis, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 27, from London, Private Robert McLaren, The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 20, from the Isle of Mull, Rifleman Cyrus Thatcher, 2nd Battalion The Rifles, aged 19, from Reading, Lance Corporal Nigel Moffett, The Light Dragoons, aged 28, from Belfast, Corporal Stephen Bolger, The Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Kieron Hill, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), aged 20, from Nottingham, Lance Corporal Robert Martin Richards, Armoured Support Group Royal Marines, aged 24, from Betws-y-Coed, North Wales, Sapper Jordan Rossi, 25 Field Squadron, 38 Engineer Regiment, aged 22, from West Yorkshire, Fusilier Petero ‘Pat’ Suesue, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, aged 28, from Fiji, Marine Jason Mackie, Armoured Support Group Royal Marines, aged 21, from Bampton, Oxfordshire, Lieutenant Mark Evison, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 26, Sergeant Ben Ross, 173 Provost Company, 3rd Regiment Royal Military Police, Corporal Kumar Pun, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Rifleman Adrian Sheldon, 2 Rifles, from Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Corporal Sean Binnie, 3 Scots, aged 22, Lance Sergeant Tobie Fasfous, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, aged 29, Corporal Dean Thomas John, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 25, from Neath, and Corporal Graeme Stiff, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 24, from Munster, Germany. Lance Corporal Christopher Harkett, 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh, aged 22, from Swansea, Marine Michael ‘Mick’ Laski, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 21, from Liverpool, Corporal Tom Gaden, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 24, from Taunton, Lance Corporal Paul Upton, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 31, Rifleman Jamie Gunn, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 21, from Leamington Spa, Lance Corporal Stephen ‘Schnoz’ Kingscott, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 22, from Plymouth, Marine Darren ‘Daz’ Smith, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 27, from Fleetwood, Lancashire, Corporal Daniel ‘Danny’ Nield, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 31, from Cheltenham, Acting Corporal Richard ‘Robbo’ Robinson, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 21, from Cornwall, Captain Tom Sawyer, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 26, from Hertfordshire, Corporal Danny Winter, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 28, from Stockport, Marine Travis Mackin, Communications Squadron United Kingdom Landing Force Command Support Group, aged 22, from Plymouth, Sergeant Chris Reed, 6th Battalion The Rifles, aged 25, from Plymouth, Corporal Liam Elms, RM, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 26, from Wigan, Lance Corporal Benjamin Whatley, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 20, from King’s Lynn, Corporal Robert Deering, Commando Logistic Regiment Royal Marines, aged 33, from Solihull, Rifleman Stuart Nash, 1st Battalion The Rifles, aged 21, from Sydney, Australia, and Lieutenant Aaron Lewis, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 26, from Essex. Lance Corporal Steven ‘Jamie’ Fellows, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 28, from Sheffield, Marine Damian Davies, aged 27, Sergeant John Manuel, aged 38, from North East England, Corporal Mark Birch, aged 26, from Northampton, Marine Tony Evans, aged 20, from Sunderland, Marine Georgie Sparks, aged 19, from Epping, Marine Alexander Lucas, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 24, from Edinburgh, Colour Sergeant Krishnabahadur Dura, 2nd Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 36, from the Lamjung District of Western Nepal, Marine Neil David Dunstan, aged 32, from Bournemouth, Marine Robert Jospeh McKibben, aged 32, from County Mayo, Rifleman Yubraj Rai, 2nd Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 28, from Khotang District, Eastern Nepal, Trooper James Munday, aged 21, from the Birmingham area, Lance Corporal Nicky Matson, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 26, from Aveley in Essex, Private Jason Lee Rawstron, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 23, from Lancashire, Warrant Officer Class 2 Gary ‘Gaz’ O’Donnell GM, 1 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment Royal Logistic Corps, aged 40, from Edinburgh, Ranger Justin James Cupples, 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment, aged 29, from County Cavan, Ireland, Corporal Barry Dempsey, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 29, from Ayrshire, Signaller Wayne Bland, 16 Signal Regiment, aged 21, from Leeds, Private Peter Joe Cowton, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 25, from Basingstoke, Sergeant Jonathan Mathews, The Highlanders, 4th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 35, from Edinburgh, Lance Corporal Kenneth Michael Rowe, Royal Army Veterinary Corps, aged 24, from Newcastle, Corporal Jason Stuart Barnes, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 25, from Exeter, Lance Corporal James Johnson, B Company, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 31, from Scotland, Warrant Officer 2nd Class Dan Shirley, Air Assault Support Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps, aged 32, from Leicester, Warrant Officer 2nd Class Michael Norman Williams, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 40, from Cardiff, Private Joe John Whittaker, 4th Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 20, from Stratford-upon-Avon, Corporal Sarah Bryant, Intelligence Corps, aged 26, from Liverpool, Corporal Sean Robert Reeve, Royal Signals, aged 28, Lance Corporal Richard Larkin, aged 39, Paul Stout, aged 31, Lance Corporal James Bateman, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 29, from Staines, Middlesex, Private Jeff Doherty, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 20, from Southam, Warwickshire, Private Nathan Cuthbertson, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 19, from Sunderland, Private Daniel Gamble, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 22, from Uckfield, East Sussex, Private Charles David Murray, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 19, from Carlisle, and Marine Dale Gostick, 3 Troop Armoured Support Company, Royal Marines, aged 22, from Oxford. Drummer Thomas Wright, 1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Forresters, aged 21, from Ripley, Derbyshire, Guardsman Neil ‘Tony’ Downes, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 20, from Manchester, Lance Corporal Paul ‘Sandy’ Sandford, 1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, aged 23, from Nottingham, Corporal Mike Gilyeat, Royal Military Police, aged 28, Corporal Darren Bonner, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 31, from Norfolk, Guardsman Daniel Probyn, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22, from Tipton, Lance Corporal George Russell Davey, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 23, from Suffolk, Guardsman Simon Davison, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 22, from Newcastle upon Tyne, Private Chris Gray, A Company 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 19, from Leicestershire, Warrant Officer Class 2 Michael ‘Mick’ Smith, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 39, from Liverpool, Marine Benjamin Reddy, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 22, from Ascot, Berkshire, Lance Bombardier Ross Clark, aged 25, from South Africa, Lance Bombardier Liam McLaughlin, aged 21, from Lancashire, Marine Scott Summers, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Crawley, East Sussex, Marine Jonathan Holland, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Chorley, Lancashire, Lance Corporal Mathew Ford, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 30, from Immingham, Lincolnshire, Marine Thomas Curry 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 21, from East London and Lance Bombardier James Dwyer, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 22. James Thompson, Trooper Ratu Sakeasi Babakobau, Household Cavalry Regiment, aged 29, from Fiji, Trooper Robert Pearson, The Queen’s Royal Lancers Regiment, aged 22, from Grimsby, Senior Aircraftman Graham Livingstone, Royal Air Force Regiment, aged 23, from Glasgow, Senior Aircraftman Gary Thompson, Royal Auxiliary Air Force Regiment, aged 51, from Nottingham, Lieutenant John Thornton, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 22, from Ferndown, Marine David Marsh, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Sheffield, Corporal Damian Mulvihill, 40 Commando Royal Marines, aged 32, from Plymouth, Corporal Damian Stephen Lawrence, 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards), aged 25, from Whitby, Corporal Darryl Gardiner, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, aged 25, from Salisbury, Wiltshire, Sergeant Lee Johnson, 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, aged 33, from Stockton-on-Tees, Trooper Jack Sadler, The Honourable Artillery Company, aged 21, from Exeter, Captain John McDermid, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 43, from Glasgow, Lance Corporal Jake Alderton, 36 Engineer Regiment, aged 22, from Bexley, Major Alexis Roberts, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, aged 32, from Kent, Colour Sergeant Phillip Newman, 4th Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 36, Private Brian Tunnicliffe, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), aged 33, from Ilkeston, Corporal Ivano Violino, 36 Engineer Regiment, aged 29, from Salford and Sergeant Craig Brelsford, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 25, from Nottingham. Private Johan Botha, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, from South Africa, Private Damian Wright, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 23, from Mansfield, Private Ben Ford, 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, aged 18, from Chesterfield, Senior Aircraftman Christopher Bridge, C flight, 51 Squadron Royal Air Force Regiment, aged 20, from Sheffield, Private Aaron James McClure, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 19, from Ipswich, Private Robert Graham Foster, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 19, from Harlow, Private John Thrumble, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 21, from Chelmsford, Captain David Hicks, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 26, from Surrey, Private Tony Rawson, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 27, from Dagenham, Essex, Lance Corporal Michael Jones, Royal Marines, aged 26, from Newbald, Yorkshire, Sergeant Barry Keen, 14 Signal Regiment, aged 34, from Gateshead, Guardsman David Atherton, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 25, from Manchester, Lance Corporal Alex Hawkins, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, aged 22, from East Dereham, Norfolk, Guardsman Daryl Hickey, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, aged 27, from Birmingham, Sergeant Dave Wilkinson, 19 Regiment Royal Artillery, aged 33, from Ashford, Kent, Captain Sean Dolan, 1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, aged 40, from the West Midlands, Marine Richard J Watson, 42 Commando Royal Marines, aged 23, from Caterham, Surrey, Marine Jonathan Wigley, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 21, from Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire, Marine Gary Wright, 45 Commando Royal Marines, aged 22, from Glasgow, Lance Corporal Paul Muirhead, 1 Royal Irish Regiment, aged 29, from Bearley, Warwickshire, Lance Corporal Luke McCulloch, 1 Royal Irish Regiment, aged 21, Corporal Mark William Wright, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 27, from Edinburgh, Private Craig O’Donnell, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, aged 24, from Clydebank, Flight Lieutenant Steven Johnson, aged 38, from Collingham, Nottinghamshire, Flight Lieutenant Leigh Anthony Mitchelmore, aged 28, from Bournemouth, Flight Lieutenant Gareth Rodney Nicholas, aged 40, from Newquay, Cornwall, Flight Lieutenant Allan James Squires, aged 39, from Clatterbridge, Flight Lieutenant Steven Swarbrick, aged 28, from Liverpool, Flight Sergeant Gary Wayne Andrews, aged 48, from Tankerton, Kent, Flight Sergeant Stephen Beattie, aged 42, from Dundee, Flight Sergeant Gerard Martin Bell, aged 48, from Ely, Cambridgeshire, Flight Sergeant Adrian Davies, aged 49, from Amersham, Buckinghamshire, Sergeant Benjamin James Knight, aged 25, from Bridgwater, Sergeant John Joseph Langton, aged 29, from Liverpool, Sergeant Gary Paul Quilliam, aged 42, from Manchester, Corporal Oliver Simon Dicketts, The Parachute Regiment, aged 27, Marine Joseph David Windall, Royal Marines, aged 22, and Ranger Anare Draiva, 1 Royal Irish Regiment, aged 27, from Fiji. Lance Corporal Jonathan Peter Hetherington, 14 Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare), aged 22, from South Wales, Corporal Bryan James Budd, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, aged 29, from Ripon, Lance Corporal Sean Tansey, The Life Guards, aged 26, from Washington, Tyne and Wear, Private Leigh Reeves, Royal Logistics Corps, aged 25, from Leicester, Private Andrew Barrie Cutts, Air Assault Support Regiment, Royal Logistics Corps, aged 19, from Mansfield, Captain Alex Eida, Royal Horse Artillery, aged 29, from Surrey, Second Lieutenant Ralph Johnson, Household Cavalry Regiment, aged 24, from Windsor, Lance Corporal Ross Nicholls, Blues and Royals, aged 27, from Edinburgh, Private Damien Jackson, 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, aged 19, from South Shields, Tyne and Wear, Corporal Peter Thorpe, Royal Signals, aged 27, from Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, Lance Corporal Jabron Hashmi, Intelligence Corps, aged 24, from Birmingham, and Captain David Patton, The Parachute Regiment, aged 38. Sergeant Paul Bartlett, Royal Marines, aged 35, Captain Jim Phillipson, 7 Parachute Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, aged 29, from St Albans, Hertfordshire, Lance Corporal Peter Edward Craddock, 1st Battalion The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, aged 31, Corporal Mark Cridge, 7 Signal Regiment, aged 25, Lance Corporal Steven Sherwood, 1st Battalion The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry, aged 23, from Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, Private Jonathan Kitulagoda, The Rifle Volunteers, aged 23, from Clifton, Bedfordshire, Sergeant Robert Busuttil, the Royal Logistic Corps, Corporal John Gregory, the Royal Logistic Corps, and Private Darren John George, the Royal Anglian Regiment.

 

 

446 – British soldiers died in Afghanistan – four times the rate of US troops, a statistical disparity which politicians at Westminster have not yet explained – answers demanded – caltonjock

 

 

Other relevant articles

https://caltonjock.com/2018/06/26/boris-johnson-avoids-heathrow-runway-vote-to-commit-more-uk-soldiers-to-the-killing-fields-of-afghanistan-but-past-events-do-not-encourage-the-deployment-of-our-young-men-and-women/

https://caltonjock.com/2018/06/22/afghanistan-revealed-retired-us-army-general-accuses-uk-general-of-failing-to-protect-soldiers-under-his-command-can-this-the-reason-uk-casualties-were-four-times-higher-than-us-soldiers/

https://caltonjock.com/2018/06/21/446-british-soldiers-died-in-afghanistan-four-times-the-rate-of-us-troops-a-statistical-disparity-which-politicians-at-westminster-have-not-yet-explained-answers-demanded/

https://caltonjock.com/2017/07/07/afghanistan-thousands-of-young-soldiers-killed-and-maimed-at-four-times-the-rate-of-the-us-forces-i-asked-why-but-never-got-an-answer-does-anybody-know/

https://caltonjock.com/2014/08/29/a-jock-soldier-in-afghanistan-reflects-on-his-lot-in-rhyme-of-sorts-read-it-and-wonder/

https://caltonjock.com/2014/08/28/afghanistan-policy-in-the-field-of-war-decided-by-labour-politicians-british-army-suffered-horrendous-casualties-four-times-greater-than-the-americans-why/

https://caltonjock.com/2017/01/18/westminster-legacy-to-many-of-scotlands-soldiers-and-veterans-after-nearly-20-years-of-war-is-a-lifetime-on-alcohol-drugs-homeless-depression-and-abuse-but-scots-look-after-their-own/

https://caltonjock.com/2016/10/29/scottish-soldiers-past-present-and-future-from-the-dole-to-the-battlefield-oh-and-theres-the-covenant/

https://caltonjock.com/2015/03/01/heros-or-cannon-fodder-valued-or-abused-easy-living-or-overstretched-reduce-or-increase-political-playthings-or-saviours-of-the-nation/

https://caltonjock.com/2015/01/23/the-chilcott-inquiry-failures-of-the-military-elite-promotion-or-death/

https://caltonjock.com/2014/10/30/sir-jeremy-heywood-the-iraq-inquiry-other-controversies-are-his-hands-clean/

https://caltonjock.com/2014/09/16/military-veterans-called-up-to-support-better-together/

 

We will remember them - Our tribute to the casualties of the Afghanistan war

 

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Corbyn Spurned the Zionist Mafia and Lost – Israel Exacted Its Revenge – Scots Need to Get Out Of Westminster and Fast

 

Labour 'failing to act on antisemitism' | The Times

 

 

Jeremy Corbyn

The suspension and removal of the Party Whip from ex-leader Jeremy Corbyn was an act of political vandalism which might yet have repercussions should the Unions take offence and withhold finance from the Party.

But I expect the present leadership are beyond caring about the Unions since finance would be assured with the return of Labour to the political control of Israel re-establishing its power over British politics.

Yet another powerful reason why Scotland needs to break free from Westminster. Scots should set their own political agenda.

 

Why not turn the UK parliament into a holocaust memorial? – Redress Information & Analysis

 

 

The Westminster Committee on Standards in Public Life states:

“Holders of public office should not place themselves under any financial or other obligation to outside individuals or organisations that might seek to influence them in the performance of their official duties.”

 

 

THE TRAITOR WITHIN: The Chairman of the Council on Tolerance and Reconciliation

 

 

The Labour Party

Gordon Brown, in a speech to a Labour Friends of Israel meeting in April 2007, said:

“I had a very clear view about the history of Israel, about the trials and tribulations of the Jewish people, about the enormous suffering and loss during the Holocaust, as well as the extraordinary struggle that my father described to me of people to create their magnificent homeland.”

The Jerusalem Post, 27 Jun 2007 responded: “New British PM will be a friend to Israel”

 

Jewish Power in Great Britain - Radio Islam

 

The Labour for Israel group, (LFI) was founded in 1957.

It is a Westminster based lobby group working within the British Labour Party to promote the State of Israel.

The group is well connected within the party, and has regular meetings with ministers.

Ambitious MPs see a role with the LFI as a good way to get ahead. Chairs of the LFI very often go on to become UK government ministers.

James Purnell, (Head of Communications at the BBC) and Jim Murphy, (Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland), were both chairmen of the group.

One of Blair’s first acts on becoming an MP in 1983 was to join the group maintaining close links with it throughout his time in office.

Blair also cultivated a personal and financial relationship with the Jewish businessman Michael Levy, and through him succeeded in gaining the financial support of many of the businessman’s Jewish friends.

Blair met Levy in 1994 at a dinner party thrown by Gideon Meir, number two at the Israeli Embassy.

The two men quickly recognized the mutual benefits offered by a working relationship.

By 1995, Blair, then the opposition leader was regularly stopping off at his new friends place for a swim and a game of tennis. But they were busy doing other things.

Between them they set up a “Blind Trust”, known as the “Labour Leader’s Office Fund” to which Levy and his business friends added over £2m.

Blair maintained that he was unaware of the sources of the donations despite being in almost constant contact with Levy and even meeting some of the donors.

Jon Mendelsohn, former chairman of the LFI and Gordon Brown’s chief election fundraiser, speaking in 2007, praised Blair’s achievement in transforming the Labour Party’s position on Israel.

He said: “Blair attacked the anti-Israelism that had existed in the Labour Party.” Blair told Levy, “I am absolutely determined that we must not go into the next election financially dependent on the trade unions.”

The trade off was to embrace “Zionism” which became the pervasive mantra of “New Labour”. The Labour Party became financially dependent on donors with strong views on Israel.

Lord Levy is estimated to have raised over £15m for the Labour Party and Blair before the “cash for peerages” ended Levy’s illegal fundraising in the summer of 2006.

 

Who liked Dispatches? – Blog – CST – Protecting Our Jewish Community

 

 

The Conservative Party

The Conservative Party Friends of Israel Lobby Group

David Cameron, in a speech to a Conservative Friends of Israel Dinner in 2010, said:

“I am proud not just to be a Conservative, but a Conservative friend of Israel; and I am proud of the key role CFI plays within our Party. Israel is a democracy, a strong and proud democracy, in a region that is, we hope, making its first steps in that direction.”

Conservative Party politician and historian Robert Rhodes James the Lobby group as: “the largest organization in Western Europe dedicated to the cause of the people of Israel.”

It is beyond doubt the best connected, and best funded, of all Westminster lobbying groups. Eighty percent of Conservative MPs are members.

Michael Mates, former member of the Parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee said, “the pro-Israel lobby in our body politic is the most powerful political lobby. There’s nothing to touch them.”

He added, “I think their lobbying is done very discreetly, in very high places, which may be why it is so effective.”

The aims of both groups is to:

Promote a strong bilateral relationship between Britain and Israel educating members of both movements on the policy successes and challenges within Israeli society.

Support the Government of Israel in its efforts to continue to seek the realization of a two state solution, with Palestine, recognized and safe within its borders, living peacefully alongside a democratic and viable Palestinian state.

 

How a throwaway 2016 Brexit remark sowed seeds that grew into this week's split in both Labour and Tory parties

 

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The Wokey’s Step Up Their Nobble Joanna Cherry Campaign – Time for the Funday’s to Rally to her Cause

 

 

100 Years of Women in Law - Discrmination and Equality - Lawson West  Solicitors in Leicester

 

Joanna Cherry

The unwarranted and indefensible attacks on the character of this truly excellent Scottish politician continue unabated. She needs to know her voice is being heard and her words of wisdom are being widely read and her views supported. Go to her Twitter page and see for yourself the abuse she suffers from the Wokey’s  for our cause.  (https://twitter.com/joannaccherry)

 

The SNP MP Joanna Cherry said that she had repeatedly raised the issue with the party “to no avail”

 

 

Joanna Cherry Defends Women’s Rights

Joanna Cherry, is the SNP Front-Bench Spokesperson, at Westminster, for Justice and Home Affairs and has been a leading voice in the campaign to keep the Human Rights Act and to stay in the European Convention on Human Rights. She was re-elected, with an increased majority of nearly 12,000, as MP for Edinburgh South West in the 2019 General Election.

She and 15 other SNP politicians, critics of Nicola’s proposal to allow gender self-identification signed a joint letter urging their government not to “rush” into “changing the definition of male and female. Their advice was that the change would weaken the rights and ability of women, to keep themselves safe from men who would seek to do them harm. A position further strengthened with the publication of the “SNP Women’s Pledge”, a document originating with rank and file members of the SNP.

But Joanna’s intervention was judged by WOKE supporters to be an unacceptable challenge to the authority of the Party leader and she was condemned and targeted by yobs who accused her and her supporters of hating Trans people. She even received a death threat and needed police protection at her constituency surgery.

In setting out their stall Joanna and her supporters had committed a fatal error. They had sought to thwart Nicola’s plans. An unacceptable sin. There would be a reckoning and soon.

In her defense Joanna stated:

“I have repeatedly denied hatred towards trans people and I am determined not to be intimidated and to continue to discharge my duties as a constituency MP and in parliament.”.

But the on-line abuse did not abate:

One attacker was Jordan Henderson, (partner of NEC member Alyn Smith) who relentlessly and brutally twittered against her and other female SNP members who did not support the WOKE agenda. In one of his less vitriolic posts, he said: “We should all change our name to ‘Joanna Cherry is a Transphobe'”.

Check-out some of his other Twitter posts at: (@montague90 and @JordonSNP). This is the same chappie who first offered then withdrew himself as a candidate for the Labour-held Edinburgh South constituency.

 

 

 

 

Edinburgh Central Constituency

Baroness “Ruth the Mooth” Davidson announced she would not be seeking election to the constituency in the 2021 General Election sparking a scramble within the SNP.

The seat, just down the road from Holyrood is much sought after by members of all political Party’s. Joanna Cherry threw her hat into the ring with an early announcement of her intention to stand for the seat. Her competition was confirmed to be ex-SNP Edinburgh Central MSP Marco Biagi and former Westminster leader Angus Robertson. But, “surprise-surprise”, a decision was made by the NEC that serving SNP MPs would have to step down ahead of next year’s Scottish Parliament election to be able to stand on the SNP ticket for a Holyrood seat. Party insiders said the change was part of a “new strategy” about ensuring constituency candidates were “onside”.

David Henry, organizer for the SNP Edinburgh Pentlands Constituency Association and secretary of the Sighthill and Stenhouse branch of the Party did not agree with the decision and lodged papers in Edinburgh Sheriff Court demanding the release of details of any advice relating to the rule change, records showing the votes and the results on the rule change on the NEC and an investigation into the conduct of the respondents over the decision.

Joanna tweeted about the decision to change the rules:

“The selection rules were subject to an unprecedented change in a secret vote to nobble my candidacy. I sought to enter the selection competition to be the SNP candidate to contest the Edinburgh Central seat currently held by the Tories. The constituency is where I’ve lived for last twenty years & been a branch member for 12 years. It is unprecedented in our party’s history of dual mandates to demand that a parliamentarian make themselves and their constituency staff unemployed in order to be eligible to be a candidate. It is particularly unreasonable to demand this in the middle of a pandemic.”

In their reply the SNP said:

“The NEC backed an approach that will guarantee constituents a full-time commitment from day one, and minimize the disruption to voters. The rules are not aimed at serving MPs such as Joanna Cherry.”

 

Analysis Of Roe V. Wade - Business Insider

 

 

 

Edinburgh Central Bid Abandoned

Joanna was forced to withdraw her bid to stand for Holyrood following the NEC rule change, widely seen as a spoiler introduced to prevent her challenging Angus Robertson, a close confidant of Nicola Sturgeon, for the nomination to fight Edinburgh Central for the SNP. Joanna Hit Back. In an article in The “National” she wrote:

“NEC members, at a meeting which I, as a member of the NEC, was prevented from attending attempted to have me deselected last year. Members of the NEC are usually afforded the facility of joining meetings by conference call when it is not possible for them to travel to the venue, which can be anywhere in Scotland, but on this occasion, I was informed by SNP HQ that this would not be available. Briefings against me continued during the general election campaign. This was upsetting not just for me but also for the SNP activists who were working hard in winter weather to have me re-elected as an SNP MP rather than sitting at home briefing Unionist newspapers against SNP candidates. In terms of the SNP constitution, the National Conference is the supreme governing and policy-making body of the party and meets at an annual conference once a year and as National Conference on at least one other occasion a year on dates and at a place fixed by the National Executive Committee. The bulk of NEC members come up for re-election at conference. We have not as yet had a conference this year and of course, the pandemic makes the usual conference impossible. However, it is past time that members were told when the much-promised online conference will take place so that they can register as delegates and ensure they are able to vote. I would hope they would consider replacing those who are bringing the party into disrepute by using their positions on the NEC to conduct personal vendettas or to clear the field of competition for their own candidacy bids or those of their friends. What we need on our NEC are members whose only priorities are the furtherance of the cause of independence, our country, its people, and the party.”

 

International Women's Day 2020: How the day began and why the fight for women's rights is

 

 

Gerrymandering of the NEC By the NEC

The election of the NEC this year has the potential to bring about fundamental change of the party in its present form since its NEC will decide the future direction of the party. The choice for independence tactics will be polarized into two factions. The WOKE activists that favour the “Gradualists” or the “Fundamentalists” who prefer direct action.

Anticipating the election of a significant number of “fundamentalists” the NEC imposed new and restrictive rules on branch management so that the NEC was enabled to veto and force changes to candidate shortlists so that a marked prevalence of WOKE activists would be assured. The process will be completed early in November.

This is the real reason the present NEC membership, (now choc-a-bloc with WOKE activists) postponed the Party conference from June until late November. They needed to be sure the fundamentalists had been castrated. And they might just succeed. In which case, there will be no further referendum before 2031 at the earliest.

 

International Women's Day: Watch NYC March in 360° | Time

 

 

SNP Members Quitting Over NEC Rulings Should Stay and Fight – Kenny McKaskill

The annual conference is coming and it’s important that actions are debated, and individuals held to account. To achieve that every member is required and those most aggrieved should get involved not leave. It’s not as if the SNP hasn’t been through this before. Back in the early 1980s, I was expelled along with Alex Salmond, Roseanna Cunningham, now Environment Secretary, and several others.

The current NEC needs to be held to account for the decisions it has taken and it or its successor must represent the interest of the membership, not self-serving cliques. The party belongs to the members which are why all should remain and change it from within. The rest of his article can be found here: {https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/snp-members-quitting-over-nec-ruling-should-stay-and-fight-kenny-macaskill-2933183}

 

Where Angels Fear to Tread – Queering the Pitch of SNP WOKE Subversives –  caltonjock

 

 

 

Festival of Democracy

Malcolm Kerr – SNP Constituency Organizer in Cunninghame North published an article in Bella Caledonia giving warning that all was not well back at the ranch (NEC). He wrote:

The soundtrack for this year’s candidate selection process is the chopping of membership cards. It is a hard time to be an SNP activist, watching long-time local stalwarts become disenchanted, trying to persuade friends to remain in the Party, running out of excuses and defenses.  It doesn’t need to be this way. Following the December 2019 General Election, we were fairly certain that the next national election would be the Scottish Parliament in May 2021. We had well over a year to prepare. The plan was to undertake vetting and selection of candidates during the spring of 2020. For three and a half months, HQ posted a text on the SNP website outlining a candidate assessment process that was clearly not taking place. Now that Covid lockdown has been eased, the process is to take place – online!  Presumably with Zoom interviews. Sadly, Keith Brown was not intending irony when he sent out his May email to members entitled “Use this time wisely!”. This process could have been finished months ago. Approved potential candidates (i.e those who have concluded vetting successfully) need to express their interest in a constituency to the National Secretary by 14th September. There is a plus side (let’s remember). ‘Yes’ is now the preferred Independence option (at 54%), our First Minister has an unprecedented level of personal approval across the country for her handling of the pandemic crisis, and we have an opposition in complete disarray. As a nation, however, we have a reputation for snatching defeat from the jaws of victory. For observers of the SNP’s HQ and NEC performance over recent years, we have come to expect very little. The slo-mo car crash around the 30th July NEC meeting was, even so, hard to watch, and not least because we have known for some time that it had to come. Any ordinary Party member can only glean small insights into what actually happened at the NEC. Minutes (if minutes are kept) are not available to us, but we can usually rely on individual NEC members leaking their accounts to the Press. Two items of business stood out.

Firstly the decision to deny James Dornan MSP the right to put his name forward for selection in Cathcart, the Scottish Parliament seat he has held and served for years

Secondly, the decision to discourage Joanna Cherry from seeking the Edinburgh Central nomination by requiring MPs to give up their Westminster seat when selected rather than once elected.

An anonymous NEC member duly released a detailed account of the proceedings, and it was not flattering to the Party hierarchy. The James Dornan decision was reversed the following day when it was found ‘unconstitutional’. It isn’t clear how the SNP’s CEO, Business Convener, and National Secretary had all failed to notice this flaw in the plan at an earlier stage! The salient features of this ‘handbags at dawn’ episode are that it was initiated by a faction very close to the Leadership and that it failed. There is also a credible view that the ‘Dornan Affair’ was only ever intended as a diversion to deflect from the core intent: pursuing an equally unconstitutional change to the candidate selection rules, effectively debarring Cherry from standing for Holyrood, as was her right. For some members, this chicanery has been the last straw.

George Kerevan gives a helpful account of what has happened to the SNP after 13 years in office. The shift to the right in policy terms has been accompanied by the rise of a powerful Party bureaucracy.  The policy is made by employed special advisers rather than members. Corporate lobbyists have easy access to ministers. With success in Westminster elections, a large number of MPs and their staff have become dependent on our opponents (the UK State) for salaries and pensions. There is a powerful system of patronage and a career ladder to keep aspiring high flyers in line and ensure their loyalty. My own extensive experience over the years confirms that Party HQ and the Leadership now have a deeply ingrained disdain for members and especially for the volunteers who run the branch and constituency networks. Associated with this is the large cohort of MPs and MSPs, their energy perhaps sapped by the routine work of representing individual constituents, whose focus and drive appears suppressed by a combination of healthy salaries and a position of relative impotence in relation to the tiny select Leadership group. The rest of the article can be found  here:  (https://bellacaledonia.org.uk/2020/08/15/festival-of-democracy/)

 

Little Bo Peep is losing her sheep – Is it Et Tu for Nicola Sturgeon –  caltonjock

 

 

 

List of Nominees for Office

(Names in bold type are Funday’s and worthy of nomination to the NEC if you support candidates who wish to retain women’s rights legislation as it is and who do not support the Gradualism agenda preferred by Nicola.  I am not sure of the Glasgow nominations and would appreciate input on this.

Conferences Committee (open list – 5 members to be elected) – Requests for Nomination:
Deadline: 13/11/2020 

Corri Wilson, Malcolm Balfour, Alexander Belic, Adam Cabuk, Christina Cannon, Roz Currie, Christopher Duffy, Ian Gallagher, Patrick Grady, Chris Hanlon, Delia Henry, Joan Hutcheson, Kenny MacLaren, Jack O’Neil, Munro Ross, Rory Steel, Subhan Tahir, Suzanne McLaughlin, Kirsteen Currie, Fraser Thompson, Danny Aston, Rosemary Hunter, Anne McLaughlin.

Conferences Committee (all-female list – 5 members to be elected) – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Rosemary Hunter, Anne McLaughlin, Corri Wilson, Christina Cannon, Roz Currie, Delia Henry, Joan Hutcheson, Suzanne McLaughlin, Kirsteen Currie, Catriona MacDonald.

Policy Development Committee – Outwith Scotland – Requests for Nomination:
Deadline: 13/11/2020

Jonathan Kiehlmann, Gordon Millar.

National Secretary – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Marco Biagi, Lorna Finn, Stewart Stevenson, David Henry, Morgwn Davies, Kirsteen Currie.

National Treasurer – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Colin Beattie, Douglas Chapman.

President – Requests for Nomination:  Deadline: 13/11/2020

Michael Russell, Craig Murray, Corri Wilson.

BAME Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Graham Campbell, Sameeha Rehman.

Disabled Members’ Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Jamie Szymkowiak, Scott McFarlane, Dylan Roberts.

Equalities Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Fiona Robertson, Siobhan Tolland, Lynne Anderson.

Local Government Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Jonathan McColl, Allan Stubbs, Lynne Anderson, Kelly Parry.

Member Support Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Michael Blackshaw, Douglas Daniel, Simon Hayter, Greg Lennon, Susan Katherine Sanders.

Organization Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Stacy Bradley, Robert Thompson. 

Policy Development Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Chris Hanlon, Graeme McCormick, Alyn Smith.

Women’s Convener – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Delia Henry, Caroline McAllister, Rhiannon Spear, Susan Katherine Sanders, Caroline Keenan.

Elected Parliamentarian – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Tommy Sheppard, Alison Thewliss, Joanna Cherry, Neale Hanvey, Angela Constance.

Glasgow (all-female list) – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Christina Cannon, Lorna Finn, Suzanne McLaughlin.

Glasgow (open list) – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Malcolm Balfour, Christina Cannon, Lorna Finn, Jonathan Mackie, Alexander Mitchell, Rory Steel,  Suzanne McLaughlin, Alexander Kerr.

Member Conduct Committee (9 members) – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Malcolm Balfour, Amanda Burgauer, Michael Blackshaw, Declan Blench, Laura Doherty, Daniel Forbes, Cynthia GuthrieChris Hanlon, Simon Hayter, Delia Henry, Kirsty Jarvis, Sharon Kinning, Greg Lennon, Paul Leinster, Kenny MacLaren, Malcolm Mitchell, Munro RossSusan Katherine Sanders, Subhan Tahir, Elaine Wylie, Ellen McMaster, Farah Farzana, Robert Thompson, James Duncan, Neale Hanvey, Gavin Lundy, Caroline McAllister, Owen Thompson, Lynne Anderson, Corri Wilson.

Appeals Committee (7 members) – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Amanda Burgauer, Rod Campbell, Ewan Hamilton, Greg Lennon, Margaret Lynch, Lachlan McNeill, Malcolm Mitchell, Farah Farzana, Robert Thompson, Caroline McAllister.

Policy Committee – Glasgow (open list) – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Malcolm Balfour, Alexander Belic, Paul Leinster, Rory Steel.

Mid Scotland And Fife – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Roger Mullin:  Women’s List: Allison Graham.

West of Scotland – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Chris McEleny, Brian Lawson, 

Lothians – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Catriona MacDonald, Susan Katherine Sanders, Robert de Bold, Frank Anderson.

Central Scotland – Requests for Nomination: Deadline:13/11/2020

John Green

South of Scotland – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

William Mills

Highlands and Islands – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Women’s list:  Laura Mitchell

North East Scotland – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Dot Jessiman, Ciaran McRae, Kate Monaghan.

South East Scotland – Requests for Nomination: Deadline: 13/11/2020

Cynthia Guthrie, Morgan Davies

 

 

Women rights symbol Royalty Free Vector Image - VectorStock

 

 

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Where Angels Fear to Tread – Queering the Pitch of SNP WOKE Subversives

 

Transgender College Students Face Enormous Mental Health Disparities » SPH  | Boston University

 

 

Are You Awake?

The spectre of a “Woke” dominated SNP Government looms menacingly, enabled through the imposition on constituencies of “right thinking” candidates by a party leadership no longer in touch with reality.

In recent years, the Party has lost focus evidenced by the introduction of controversial policy changes without consultation with or support of a majority of Party members and officials.

The criteria for selection as a candidate of the Party, until now, has been a straightforward process. Individuals were local to their community and possessed a solid record of active campaigning for the cause of independence.

But that changed when Nicola announced her intention to bring in changes to the “Gender Reassignment Act” permitting individuals to “self-declare” their gender.

Currently the law states that those seeking to officially change gender have to live in the preferred gender for two years and be diagnosed with gender dysphoria by a doctor to gain a Gender Recognition Certificate.

Nicola and her supporters were warned that their proposals were toxic and the debate over legal changes would be protracted, divisive and perhaps unsuccessful, but they decided to press on with the change.

As projected the proposals polarized opinion within the Party, many believing a change to “self-declaration” would eliminate women’s sex-protected rights and undermine data which is dependent on knowing if a person is a man or a woman. A number of women’s groups added their voices to the protests.

 

Anti-trans speakers invited to parliament on Trans Day of Remembrance

 

 

One Scottish MSP, a committed nationalist not known for rebelling, Joan McAlpine, the chair of Holyrood’s “Culture and External Affairs Committee, spoke publicly about her concerns, and was abused by WOKE campaigners and and threatened with deselection.

In voicing an opinion she stood charged by the WOKEs’ as being a gender-critical trans-exclusionary radical feminist (TERF). So I must be a TERM. Got to get to grips with this new language!!!

Her committee also feared the inclusion of “non-binary” questions in census forms devaluing the data on a protected characteristic (sex) under the Equality Act.

There was also concern that women’s groups, in receipt of substantial amounts of taxpayers’ money, had dogmatically adopted the WOKE ideology while failing to represent women who disagreed.

This generated long worded denials from Scottish Government funded organisations: “Close the Gap” £225k: “Engender Scotland” £250k and “Equate Scotland”: £350k. New to you? and to me. How many more are there?

She was also attacked by some of her own SNP colleagues. Namely:

Rhiannon Spear, chair of the LGBT education lobby, “Tie” (Time for Inclusive Education).

She accused Joan of “stoking a fire” and “willfully ignoring the advice of service providers who have been working in the industry for decades”.

Michael Gibbons, head of the SNP’s student wing, who said: “There is nothing socialist, brave, or feminist about giving a platform to a TERF under a pretense of debate and discussion. It’s disingenuous and wrong.”

But Joan hit back with her statement:

“They try to shut you up by labelling you and othering you, by using extremist language. This isn’t just about trans people’s rights; they have the same human rights as everyone else and extra protections in the Equality Act and hate legislation, and that’s quite right. This is about women’s rights and how the changes being pushed for impact women.”

Find her on twitter, https://twitter.com/JoanMcAlpine/status/1101251118611525633

 

MEP Alyn Smith and ex-MP Steven Paterson go head to head for SNP Stirling  nomination

 

 

public profile campaigning can be a frustrating and lonely pastime

WOKE activists are behind a fast spreading culture of intimidation and self-censorship within the SNP and beyond.

Only last month the contents of private direct mail messages between female three SNP, MSPs, Gillian Martin, Ash Denham and Ruth Maguire was leaked to the public by the WOKE activist and SNP member, Jordan Henderson, (partner of NEC member, Alyn Smith) who summarized their exchange of views to read:

“The First Minister is “out of step” with the views of the SNP group at Holyrood over the impact on women of possible changes to the Gender Recognition Act and she is blind to the fact that the WOKE agenda is a real and dangerous threat to women and feminism”

Henderson added:

“Deeply concerning to see this conversation between SNP elected members claiming the FM is out of step for backing trans rights in Scotland. @theSNP and @NicolaSturgeon must act.”

An SNP source commented:

“This was a private conversation We know that staff can access MSPs’ Twitter accounts, so it will be extremely hurtful for the MSPs’ involved to think that one of their staff has leaked this to Jordan Henderson.

But the fact remains that a majority of SNP, MSPs’ are concerned about the impact of transgender self-identification on women’s rights and this should be able to be raised publicly without abuse. This kind of leak doesn’t help that happen.”

 

I will not suppress my views on gender, says Joanna Cherry, SNP hopeful" |  Mumsnet

 

WOKEism is spreading

The policy of removing long standing and other preferred candidates and replacing them with WOKE activists started with the parachuting of the Party’s “Policy Development Convener” and leading “WOKE” supporter, Alyn Smith, (MEP) direct from his office in Brussels to stand as the Party’s 2019 General Election “shoo-in” candidate for a seat in Westminster.

NEC member Smith, spoken of in some circles as a future Party leader was duly elected and set his stall out early on with his appointment of “WOKE” activists to his office, including Cameron Archibald, (from the Bannockburn branch).

If you wish to know more about Archibald check out his twitter posts, “MammothWhale” and “TheStirlingWolf”. He really is a corker!!

The procedures for selecting candidates for the 2021 General Election is now under way and there are reports from Branches of gerrymandering by the NEC who have introduced policy changes removing all powers from Branches demitting the selection and short listing of candidates from Branches to the WOKE supporting NEC.

 

New Campaign Wants You To Know Transgender People Have Periods Too

 

 

 

Comment:

WOKE ideology conflates sex and gender, but they are different. Being born a male or female is a fact of biology. Adopting a masculine or feminine persona is attributable to social conditioning and performance. Sex is data, gender is narrative. If the dangly bits are intact you are a male.

 

Facial recognition tech struggles to identify transgender people | E&T  Magazine

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Public Exposure of Commercial Shenanigans and Unjustifiable Salary Deals Support Increasing Calls for the BBC to be Dismantled

Weekend Open Thread – Biased BBC

 

 

 

Tinopolis (PLC)

Not a lot of people know it but five billionaires and their corporations own and control around 80 per cent of the UK media providing them with the means and opportunity to maliciously influence and control political and cultural agendas shaping the knowledge, behavior and beliefs of the population effectively destroying free thinking.

Founded by Welshman, Ron Jones, in 1989, Tinoplis (PLC), based in Llanelli, Wales was established to make programmes for the Welsh language channel SC4.

It went public in 2005 and a year later it launched and won a hostile takeover of the much larger “Television Corporation”.

The acquisition of the company and its production teams at Mentorn and Sunset + Vine, (producers of Question Time and other BBC programmes) transformed the fortunes of the company overnight and 15 short years later it is one of the five aforementioned conglomerates.

The extraordinary expansion of the company from that time, was also made possible with the financial support of the BBC and the offshore registered global equity fund, Vitruvian Partners.

Jones has increased his influence and control of the media market in the UK growing his company to be a world leader serving the BBC and other media networks, broadcasters in the United Kingdom, United States and other countries worldwide producing reality shows, documentaries, infotainment, films, dramas, factual, lifestyle, comedy, game-shows, sports, education, skills, multi-lingual, marketing and communication, e-learning, and mobile-learning courses.

Its portfolio of programming is delivered to customers through its “Mediajet” platform, a cloud based digital media delivery network for distributing broadcast video and media files to multiple locations.

An address to the city of London financial market stated:

“The Tinopolis Group is one of the largest television content suppliers in the UK and a producer of programmes for many of the top networks in the US. The group’s portfolio of production companies includes global sports producer Sunset+Vine, Mentorn Media, Firecracker, Pioneer, Tinopolis Cymru, the recently launched Thunderclap Media, drama producers Daybreak Pictures and Fiction Factory, as well as A.Smith & Co and Magical Elves in the US. Tinopolis also has its own distribution arm, Passion.”

Ron Jones adding:

“Our success has been founded on the talent of our people, their creativity and their leadership. With Vitruvian’s investment and support over the past 9 years, we have made Tinopolis a leading player in our industry. Sunset+Vine has achieved remarkable growth to become, in its own right, a global company. To our original UK base we added two of the finest production companies in the US and with them some of the most creative people in US television. We are a private company owned by its management in both countries, optimistic for the future and determined to provide our people with new challenges and opportunities.”

 

Bias, Corruption & Coercion: Why The BBC Must Be ...

 

 

The BBC – Tax Avoidance Links

The Canary revealed that BBC Question Time was linked to companies named in the Paradise Papers for offshore tax avoidance.

The programme’s production company, Mentorn Media, created in 2005, is a subsidiary company of the Tinopolis group.

Tinopolis had a majority shareholder called Vitruvian in place until 23 October 2017.

The private equity firm had purchased a 48% stake in Tinopolis in 2008 and was the ultimate controlling company named in the Paradise Papers – all while having been the ultimate owner of the Question Time producers.

(https://www.thecanary.co/uk/2017/11/23/question-time-just-linked-paradise-papers-maybe-panel-will-debate-tonight-images/)

 

 

 

Offshore Registration and Tax Avoidance – Vitruvian Equity

Forming part of its large portfolio of companies Vitruvian owned “OpenBet”, an online gambling software company through which it operates the “employee benefit trust”, a tax reduction scheme. The scheme is/was designed to provide employee benefits, such as shares and “cash payments”, through a tax jurisdiction such as Jersey much reducing the employee’s tax bill.

 

Is the BBC biased?: Testament of Bias

 

 

 

The BBC and Tax Avoidance

The BBC repeatedly pressed the Government to allow an increase in the licence fee but there was public concern that the BBC wage bill was extortionately high and should be reduced.

As ever, the BBC rejected all assertions and waffled on about market competition for high profile and good quality production staff. The public response was to ask the BBC to publish an annual list all high earners.

The first answer from the BBC was a resounding No!!! But, Shock and horror the Government agreed and required the BBC to publish!! just such a list naming all employees earning more than £150,000 per annum.

Whilst some names surfaced over time the earnings of many high profile media personalities and producers was not in the public domain.

Why was this? Sheer bloody mindedness. In response to the Government instruction, the BBC transferred the employment of many high earners to its “in house” production arm, BBC Studios, introducing them to the heady world of the “Employee Benefit Trust Scheme” disappearing them from the payroll.

The BBC stood accused of thwarting the will of the public through the use of questionable accounting’ to avoid scrutiny.

The BBC response was swift and adamant. It would not publish financial information pertaining to the recently formed arms length “BBC Studios” subsidiary.

A BBC spokesman said: “The Government has said we only need to disclose payments made to individuals directly by the licence fee. Some well-known names on the BBC are on programmes made by independent production companies. We pay a fee to the company for the delivery of the programmes. The decision on what to pay the talent and the contractual obligations rests with the independent producers rather than the BBC.”

The Culture Media and Sport committee investigated the matter and after nearly 2 years of protracted discussion the BBC capitulated and agreed to publish all relevant information in the public domain.

 

BBC presenter confesses broadcaster ignores complaints of ...

 

 

The BBC High Earner List

The names and earnings of highly paid employees of “BBC Studios” shocked the nation.

Chris Evans: £2.5m: Dabbles in programme production topping up his bank balance.

Gary Lineker: £1.8m: For pontificating about English football. His production company Goldhanger Films also makes films for the BBC. A nice little earner on the side.

Zoe Ball: £1.3m: Hosts radio breakfast Show and presents work for Strictly Come Dancing. Additional earnings include presenting “It Takes Two”.

Graham Norton: £725k: Hosts weekly show on Radio 2 and a range of programmes and series, Bafta film and TV awards. Additional earnings from the “Graham Norton Show” are paid to his production company taking his overall financial package to around £4m.

Steve Wright: £475k: Hosts Steve Wright in the Afternoon on Radio 2 show and Steve Wright’s Sunday Love Songs.

Huw Edwards: £465k: Newsreader for News at Six, News at Ten and presenter of election night and news specials.

Fiona Bruce: £450k: Hosts Question Time and presenter on BBC One.

Vanessa Feltz: £405k: Hosts Radio 2’s early Breakfast Show, Radio London Breakfast Show and Radio 2 cover.

Lauren Laverne: £395k: Hosts BBC 6 Music Breakfast Show, 6 Music Recommends, Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs and Mercury Music Prize.

Alan Shearer: £390k: Hosts Match of the Day: Premier League and FA Cup.

Stephen Nolan: £390k: Hosts The Nolan Show on Radio Ulster, Nolan Live on BBC One (Northern Ireland), The Stephen Nolan Show on 5 Live.

Ken Bruce: £385k: Hosts Radio 2’s Mid Morning Show, Eurovision Song Contest, Radio 2 Live in Hyde Park.

Emily Maitlis: £375k: Newsnight, BBC documentaries and election programme

Claudia Winkleman: £370k Weekly show for Radio 2, a range of programmes and series

Andrew Marr: £365k: The Andrew Marr Show, Radio 4’s Start the Week, Documentaries for BBC One and election night

Scott Mills: £350k: Radio 1’s The Scott Mills Show, Radio 5’s The Scott Mills and Chris Stark Show

George Alagiah: £325k: News at Six and News at Ten

Jeremy Vine: £325k: Daily show on Radio 2, election programme

Nicky Campbell: £305k: Radio 5 Live Breakfast Show, Your Call

Nick Robinson: £295k: Radio 4’s Today programme, Radio 4’s Political Thinking, Panorama on Brexit, election specials

Laura Kuenssberg: £295k: Political editor, election night, BBC Two documentaries

Jason Mohammad: £290k: Daily BBC Wales programme and other BBC Wales TV output, Final Score, other football, The Boat Race, Radio 2’s Good Morning Sunday

Jo Whiley: £285k:Radio 2 evening show

Sara Cox: £280k: Radio 2 Drivetime show, Radio 2 Live in Hyde Park

Evan Davis: £280k: Radio 4’s PM and Radio 4’s The Bottom Line

Sophie Raworth: 280k: BBC News at Six, BBC News at Ten, election programme

Greg James: £275k: Radio 1 Breakfast Show, Radio 1’s Teen Awards and Big Weekend, Radio 4’s Rewinder

Mishal Husain: £270k: Radio 4’s Today programme, BBC One presenting, Radio 4’s From Our Home Correspondent

Emma Barnett: £265k: Radio 5 Live’s The Emma Barnett Show, BBC Two’s Newsnight, election work

Dan Walker: £265k: BBC One’s Breakfast, Football Focus

Martha Kearney: £256k: Radio 4’s Today programme, Radio 4 documentary

Tina Daheley: £260k: Radio 2 Breakfast Show, Beyond Today podcast, BBC One News, BBC Breakfast cover, BBC World Service’s The Cultural Frontline, election programme, cover for Woman’s Hour

Sarah Montague: £255k: Radio 4’s World at One, HardTalk

Justin Webb: £255k: Radio 4’s Today programme

Mark Chapman: £250k: Radio 5 Live Sport, weekly Premier League highlights, Rugby League and NFL

Nick Grimshaw: £245k: Radio 1’s drivetime show, Radio 1’s Big Weekend

Jon Sopel: £240k: North America editor, Radio 4’s Today programme cover

Jeremy Bowen: £225k: Middle East editor

Trevor Nelson: £225k: Radio 2’s Rhythm Nation, weekend shows on 1Xtra

Kirsty Wark: £220k: BBC Two’s Newsnight, cover for Radio 4’s Start the Week and Talking Books

Victoria Derbyshire: £220k: Lead presenter on BBC Two’s Victoria Derbyshire and the BBC News Channel

Clive Myrie: £220k: BBC News Channel, BBC One and location work

Louise Minchin: £220k: BBC One’s Breakfast, Triathlon: World Series

Mary Berry: £20k: A range of TV programmes and series

Katya Adler: £215k: Europe Editor

Amol Rajan: £210k: Media Editor, Radio 4’s The Media Show, cover on Radio 2, Radio 4’s Start the Week, TV documentaries

Fergal Keane: £210k: Africa Editor, World Service and Radio 4 documentaries

Sue Barker: £205k: Wimbledon, Queen’s, ATP World Tour Finals, Australian Open, BBC documentaries

Jermaine Jenas: £205k: Match of the Day: Premier League and FA Cup, MOTDx and Friday Football Social

The rest of the list:

£200k: Naga Munchetty, John McEnroe. £195k: Charlie Stayt, Simon Jack. £190k: Mark Easton, Gabby Logan. £185k: Reeta Chakrabarti. £180k: Rachel Burden. 175k: Andrew Neil, James Naughtie, Annie Mac, Nihal Arthanayake, Jonathan Agnew. £170k: Ben Brown, John Pienaar. £165k: Simon McCoy, Orla Guerin, Shaun Keaveny. £160k: Carrie Gracie, Faisal Islam, Clara Amfo, Adrian Chiles, Clare Balding, £155k: Carolyn Quinn, Jane Hill, Mary Anne Hobbs, Joanna Gosling, Steve Lamacq.

 

BBC Bias article - UK Political Cartoonist Cartoons

 

Comment:

“Smoke and mirrors”, a hefty wedge of Scottish licence fee revenue is routinely transferred to a Welsh and international commercial enterprise which pervasively influences viewers through the retention and exercising of editorial control over production.

Many thousands of viewer complaints about a lack of a code of practice regarding selection criteria for participation in and the conduct of the “Question Time”, audience, have been advanced as examples of shoddy editorial work and programme management!!!

In each and every case complaints have been dismissed by the commissioning agent, the BBC, as unfounded. So much for impartiality!!!

Scottish production companies, wholly registered in Scotland, should be awarded contracts from BBC (Scotland) so that Scottish licence fee payers can be assured their financial contribution is being spent wisely retaining and developing Scottish workers and enterprises.

That was the commitment to Scotland by the BBC only a few years ago. But Scotland continues to be ripped off by franchise commitments entered into by the Westminster government and the BBC Trust.

An Anti-Scots Bias report was discussed in committee at Holyrood in 2014. It is worthy of study since many of the negative observations contained in it are still relevant 6 years later. So much for progress!!!

(https://www.parliament.scot/parliamentarybusiness/report.aspx?r=9013&mode=pdf)

 

Pin on White Apathy, Ignorance and Psychosis

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BBC Claptrap Exposed – Cosy Relationships Between Mentorn and BBC Scotland Adversely Impact on Impartiality Claim

 

Damo on Twitter: "The final two contenders get chosen by Tory MP's. The  winner is chosen by Tory members. The next PM get's chosen from amongst a  rump of predominantly pale, male

 

Mentorn Television Production

Not long after Scottish devolution, following storms of protest from Scottish viewers and politicians the BBC agreed to transfer a significant amount of television production to Scotland greatly increasing Scottish content.

Implementation of change would be achieved without detriment to existing staff employed in England or to operational routine.

Smoke and mirrors time:

The BBC in London, restructured its programme production contract with Mentorn (a small but growing subsidiary of the Tinopolis Group, an offshore registered media producer & and distributor).

Mentorn, set up a Glasgow office in 2002, in compliance with the BBC commitment to transfer finance and programme making to Scotland.

From then Mentorn expanded its programme production and distribution many times over, including the Unionist biased, Question Time.

 

Memes of the Week 15/2/19 - Dorset Eye

 

Mentorn & Nickilai Gentchev

This is how the production of Question Time was (paper) transferred to Scotland.

Gentchev, in the employ of Mentorn, transferred from London to Glasgow taking on the role of editor of Question Time.

In his new role he worked with Haley Valentine, who was appointed to the new (non-job) post of Executive Editor. A Scottish face need to be put in place comforting Scots licence holders and politicians

He remained in the employ of Mentorn for the duration of his tenure (2011-2016) reporting to Gavin Allen, the London based, Head of BBC Political News, who who continued to meet his salary.

He also wrote articles for the International Socialism Journal and Socialist Review. A revelation that led to attacks by Tory politicians saying that his background provided credence to their claims that the programme was a mouthpiece for left-wing politicians and activists.

The move was also openly criticized by its presenter, David Dimbleby, who insisted that weekly editorial meetings continue to take place in London. The programme also saw the resignation of its incumbent Editor, Ed Havard, who resigned rather than transfer to Scotland.

 

David Dimbleby leaves Question Time as one of the greatest broadcasters  ever – here's why | Metro News

 

Hayley Valentine

Family: Born in Glenrothes in 1971. Schooling: Auchtermuchty High School & Edinburgh University. Career: Journalism: First worked in Dundee before moving on to work in commercial radio in Edinburgh. Progressed to producing television programming with Scottish Television then for BBC Scotland. Promoted and transferred to London taking up a post editing BBC Breakfast TV. Set her stall on working in radio and rewarded with her appointment as Head of News, for BBC Radio 5 Live.

 

Flyer 7: #BBCbias #MediaBias - #StopTheTories Channel

 

 

2013: Haley Valentine and Question Time taken to Task by The Electoral Reform Society (Scotland)

Message from: the Electoral Reform Society Scotland, to: Haley Valentine Executive Editor, Question Time. Date Jun 2013

The Electoral Reform Society in Scotland seeks to inform and improve Scotland’s democracy.

With that in mind, we have being undertaking an inquiry into what a good Scottish democracy looks like.

A major theme that has emerged from this year long, citizen led inquiry, is the importance of the media to instruct, publicize and inform the debate.

There has been support for a publicly funded media provider, but a strong sense that that body should be impartial and should seek to provide balanced and informed coverage of politics.

Clearly this is of particular concern in the run up to the 2014 referendum.

We were concerned therefore to see the line-up for the BBC Question Time programme to be held in Edinburgh this evening (Thursday 13th June).

Not only does the selection of panelists fail to represent the make-up of Scottish politics, but it also seems to be aimed more at pantomime than serious debate.

That this should be the case when the audience is, very pleasingly, to be made up of 16 and 17 year old’s in recognition of the extension of the franchise to that group for the referendum is worrying.

It seems to show a lack of respect for these young audience members – implying that they do not deserve serious political debate.

It also fails to allow them to hear from their elected representatives in this public debate forum which receives the widest of political attention.

Two of the parties which will be competing for their vote in 2014 are unrepresented and the Yes and Better Together campaigns are needlessly unequally represented.

Were this not bad enough, available spaces on the platform are taken instead by George Galloway MP and Nigel Farage M.E.P., two individuals and parties who are not represented in Scotland.

We welcome the decision to involve 16 and 17 year old’s in a public debate about the referendum, but the chosen panelists do those 16 and 17 year old’s a disservice as they will not be able to hear from the parties who represent them and who will be seeking their vote in 2014.

We would ask the BBC to urgently reconsider the panel, and at the very least to re-schedule a repeat of this edition of Question Time, but with a panel representative of Scottish politics that respects the BBC’s role to be impartial and equal.

 

The New BBC Scotland Channel is Scheduled to Start Broadcasting in February  2019 – Hayley Valentine – A Tied and Tested BBC Unionist Grasshopper Is  Taking Charge of Output – Like it

 

 

2013: Scottish Greens Co-convener Patrick Harvie MSP added his voice

Message from: The Scottish Green Party. to: Hayley Valentine Executive Director, Question Time. Date: June 2013

We wish to object in the strongest possible terms to the choice of panelists for BBC Question Time, tonight. (June 2013).

This follows our consistent raising of concern over a number of years about the Scottish Greens’ lack of representation on the programme; in 14 years of continuous Parliamentary representation, we have been invited to participate on 1 single occasion.

That occasion was nearly two and a half years ago.

Tonight’s programme will be coming from Edinburgh, with an audience of 16 & 17 year old’s, debating independence – this is specifically billed on the BBC website.

The panel chosen is extremely skewed on the independence question; with only one panelist explicitly committed to independence as a preferred constitutional option, the programme is showing no balance whatsoever on this crucial question.

Green MSP Patrick Harvie is a member of the Yes Scotland advisory board and could have provided the required balance; he is also a member of Referendum Bill Committee in Parliament, which has been handling the legislation to reduce the voting age to 16.

Given that this decision is being made by the Scottish Parliament, we can see no basis for the decision to include only one M.S.P. on the panel, and specifically one who is opposed to the reduction in the voting age.

George Galloway is an MP for an English constituency representing a political party, Respect, which literally does not exist in Scotland, and contests no elections.

On the one occasion when they did, Mr Galloway stood for election in Glasgow and even in a PR election was only able to secure 3.3% of the vote.

Nigel Farage has also been added to the panel at the last minute.

U.K.I.P. has no elected representation in Scotland at any level, as against S.G.P.’s 2 M.S.P.s and 14 local Councillors.

In the last Scottish Parliament election they secured 0.91% of regional votes across Scotland.

This panel is taking place during the Aberdeen Donside by-election, and the BBC has a duty to demonstrate balance at such a time.

Donside is part of the North East Scotland region, where U.K.I.P. achieved 0.9% of the vote in the 2011 election.

The rationale for this selection may include U.K.I.P.’s recent success in the English local elections. U.K.I.P. now have approximately the same number of local Councillors as G.P.E.W., despite blanket media coverage.

But this is NOT an English local election, it’s a debate with a Scottish independence focus, taking place during a Scottish Parliamentary by-election.

This failure even to attempt balance in party political terms, or in terms of the referendum debate is surely a breach of the BBC’s duty to impartiality.

Patrick Harvie discussed these various points with Nicolai Gentchev this morning, and our head of media Jason Rose raised them with Phil Abrams of the BBC policy unit.

Mr Gentchev defended the decision to include Mr Farage on the programme citing his recent encounter with protesters in Edinburgh.

We are deeply disturbed if the BBC’s flagship political debate programme gives greater attention to political stunts than to fair balance.

We seek an urgent meeting to discuss how you intend to redress this situation, not only in the short term but in the run-up to the referendum in 2014. (Martha Wardrop and Patrick Harvie, Co-conveners of the Scottish Green Party).

 

My Attempt to Unravel Just a Little Bit of the Tangled Web of Deceit Spun  By the BBC – £300M Plus Scottish Licence Fee Money Routinely Handed Over to  Commercial Concerns Controlled

2013: Haley Valentine Jumps ship and transfers her employment to Mentorm

Mentorn Media Confirmed Hayley Valentine as its new director of current affairs.

She is joining Mentorn from BBC Scotland where she has been executive editor of Question Time.

Based in Glasgow, she will continue to oversee the programme for Mentorn as well as BBC One’s The Big Questions and continuing the growth of Mentorn’s current affairs output across all broadcasters.

Chief executive of Mentorn Media, John Willis, said: “Hayley is the perfect person to head up Mentorn’s current affairs programming.

She has extensive knowledge and experience and we are delighted she will be responsible for developing even more programming from our ever-expanding Glasgow office.”

Valentine said: “I’ve been on the receiving end of the impressive editorial work that Mentorn has produced and I look forward to maintaining that level of commitment to BBC programming as well as developing new and engaging formats across all broadcasters.”

 

The BBC | Propaganda, Bbc, Told you so

2016/17: BBC Forced to make changes

Repeated demands over nearly 20 years, from viewers and politicians in Scotland, for news and current affairs programming to be produced in Scotland, for a Scottish audience fell on deaf ears in London.

But the Corporation was forced to respond to demands for change following widespread criticism of its referendum coverage.

It announced a new BBC Scotland channel which would broadcast from 7pm to midnight every day, as well as being available online and on iPlayer.

With a budget of around £30m it would feature acquired programmes and programmes from partners in the creative sector and from other countries and a selection of content sourced from other BBC services.

 

Has Question Time been unfairly dominated by Remainers? – Daily Globe

 

 

2018: Haley Valentine Returns to the BBC

Valentine, executive editor of the BBC’s, Question Time, the much criticized flagship political debate show, has been appointed editor of the “integrated news hour” a key part of the BBC Scotland channel.

The new bulletin includes national and international news and is broadcast between 9pm and 10pm on the new channel.

Not much of a change really, since she is already the director of current affairs at Mentorn Scotland, the company which makes the bloody programme for the BBC.

She said: “to be given the opportunity to launch a brand new programme at the heart of the proposed new BBC Scotland Channel is a real privilege and a rare treat.

We will be creating a really distinctive programme with a broad Scottish, UK-wide and international news agenda which has the priorities of a Scottish audience at the centre of everything we do.”

Gary Smith, head of news and current affairs at BBC Scotland, said: “Hayley has an outstanding track record and I’m delighted she is rejoining us.

I’m confident that under her leadership we will produce an exciting, distinctive, and brilliant new programme for our audiences.

She will also join my management team, and play a key role in the running of the department and the recruitment of the 80 new jobs which are being created through the BBC’s major investment in journalism in Scotland.” (and that is another story to be told)

 

Project Fear Lives: BBC Pushes Anti-Brexit Study by Group Funded by the EU  and Advised by Top Eurocrats - Conservative News & Right Wing News | Gun  Laws & Rights News Site

 

 

2017/18: The New BBC Scotland Channel Takes Shape

80 new journalists were hired in the run-up to the launch of The Nine.

New appointments included James Cook, the BBC’s former North America correspondent, as chief news correspondent, innovation correspondent Laura Goodwin, David Farrell as entertainment reporter, A Europe correspondent, Jean MacKenzie, and three new political reporters – Rajdeep Sandhu, Lynsey Bews and David Lockhart.

 

BBC bias banner at anti Iraq war demo in London Stock Photo - Alamy

 

 

2018: Hayley Valentine – A voice from cloud Cookoo Land

Referring to her work with Mentorm as Executive Editor of Question Time and the Scottish Independence Referendum, she said:

“I was involved in our referendum programming and I will defend it to accusations of bias until my dying day.

I’m not saying the BBC or any other broadcaster was perfect.

It was a tricky time, but we were all doing the best we could.

I don’t know a single journalist who brought any bias to work with them.

I’m aware that there are trust issues, but I think they are sometimes overplayed.

The BBC is still trusted, and BBC Scotland is still trusted, more than most news organisations.

I don’t think we are universally dismissed on a trust basis.

Across the piece, the public looks at lot more skeptically at journalism than it potentially did ten years ago.

To be trusted, you have to give people things that they want and have a need for, and stories that they wouldn’t otherwise be told.

A key aim of “The Nine” is to move political journalism away from institutions and translate politics into how it affects ordinary people.

I hope “The Nine” will restore faith in BBC Scotland by shunning top-down journalism, reducing the use of jargon and making people feel we are for them and of them.

Our remit is to serve the audience better, ask questions that people want asked, explore bits of Scottish life that aren’t currently being explored and reflect their lives back at that them.

That will get people to like and trust our programme.

It can do a lot to make people feel that we are for them and of them.”

What a load of Tosh!!!!  Her statement conflicts sharply with verified opinion polling carried out in the wake of the referendum which found that viewers in Scotland were more unhappy about the BBC’s output than any other part of the media.

Indeed one survey found that a third of audiences in Scotland believed that the BBC was biased against independence.

 

Trojan Hearse – Biased BBC

 

 

Sep 2020: New BBC Scotland Channel Is A Dud

launched in February 2019 average audience figures peaked around a satisfactory 60,000, but the honeymoon did not last long, figures had slumped to under 19,000 by the beginning of May 2019.

Over that same period 21 shows recorded an audience of zero. and in one day in May only 7200 viewers tuned in.

The flagship “nine news” also recorded zero viewers on a number of occasions.

Channel content has gone from bad to worse in 2020, viewing figures have plummeted and the channel will most likely close.

It just didn’t deliver what Scots want which is Scottish news and current affairs delivered on BBC1 at 6 and 9.

Valentine and her large expensively salaried team might just be returning to Mentorn very soon. A waste of licence fee payers hard earned money.

And the transfer of £80m from London to Scotland just didn’t happen. Just about all of the production work was awarded to Mentorn whose profits end up with their parent company registered offshore. I’ll write about them next time.

Is the BBC biased?: Complaints from both sides.

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Scottish Independence – Get the Gloves Aff – Abstentionism the Way Forward

 

 

The 1707 Act of Union Handed Scotland Over To a Very Wealthy English Elite Supported By Lickspittle Unionist Politicians Who Maintain Their Power Through the Impositon of Oppression on Scots – caltonjock

 

In my previous post I forgot to include the measures that need to be taken now taking forward the cause of Scottish independence. Corrected with this post.

 

 

Union of 1707 - The Union Achieved

 

 

The Discredited 1707 Act of Union

The 1707 “Act of Union” was signed off, against the wishes of Scots, by a corrupt landowning, political elite.

It was heralded by the English as a voluntary joining of the two nations which would become a single United Kingdom. All would be equal.  But that is not what transpired.

The English trap was sprung within weeks of the signing of the treaty when the Sovereign of the two states declared Westminster to be the seat of the newly formed United Kingdom.

England’s green and pleasant land would survive but Scotland would be consigned to the historical rubbish dump.

And historical evidence from that time to the present day supports many thousands of allegations that Westminster politicians have only ever acted in the best interests of England and against the needs of Scots.

 

The 1707 Act of Union Handed Scotland Over To a Very Wealthy English Elite Supported By Lickspittle Unionist Politicians Who Maintain Their Power Through the Impositon of Oppression on Scots – caltonjock

 

Scots Are Ready for Change: Now::

Conditioned by the brutality of the first and each succeeding Westminster regime over 300+ years, the Scottish view of Westminster is far removed from that of the people of Newcastle or Leeds.

The majority of Scots perceive Westminster to be a parliament that has imposed 313+ years of murderous and dictatorial rule.

They see it as a political regime that has denied them their right to economic and political sovereignty. Westminster is not Scotland’s Parliament and never will be.

Scots, with Brexit forced upon them against their wishes, are now clear in their minds that Unionist politicians will continue to impose their will over Scots regardless of any economic, social or other hardship.

The Scottish nation is of little consequence to the political ambitions of the political elite of Westminster.

How did England and Scotland become the 'United Kingdom'? - ppt download

 

Modified Abstentionism

S.N.P. MP’s should no longer routinely participate in any of the political activities at Westminster, including withdrawing MP’s from all joint committees and no attendance in the House of Commons.

MP’s would, in all other respects, continue to actively represent their constituents fully engaging with other political Party’s and their representatives on matters affecting Scots.

This would ensure no financial detriment to S.N.P. MP’s. but would send a shot across the bows of the English dominated parliament and frighten the Labour and Liberal Party’s who would be consigned to the opposition benches forever.

 

Scottish and English history: 1707 act of union : HistoryMemes